Discussion:
XFCE terminal issue
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Clark Smith
2018-06-13 16:00:01 UTC
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I launched a thread on this recently in a different group, and
the feedback that I got makes me wonder if this is a Slackware
peculiarity?

I am running an XFCE desktop in Slackware64 14.2. I use the
shipped xfce4-terminal terminal emulator. Occasionally, I would like to
change the font size for a particular instance of one such emulator - not
for all instances that I may have. The feedback that I got is that Ctrl-+
and Ctrl-- in the target terminal window should do the trick, or, failing
that, a right click in the target terminal window should elicit a menu
containing Zoom In/Zoom Out options.

The thing is, that does not work for me. Ctr-+ and Ctrl-- do
nothing, and right click elicits a menu with no Zoom In/Zoom Out options.
Somebody pointed out that it might be a version issue. People seem to be
using xfec4-terminal version 0.8.6 (under XFCE 4.12, as in Slack 14.2)
whereas Slack 14.2 ships 0.6.3. To my knowledge, this has not been
updated in any subsequent patches. I therefore upgraded it myself to
0.8.6 (it builds without problems) but the behavior described does not
change.

Can anybody using XFCE under Slack 14.2 throw some light here?
Eef Hartman
2018-06-13 17:34:01 UTC
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The feedback that I got is that Ctrl-+ and Ctrl-- in the target
terminal window should do the trick, or, failing that, a right click
in the target terminal window should elicit a menu > containing Zoom
In/Zoom Out options.
As far as I know that was only in older versions of xfce4-terminal,
when that command still was a front-end for gnome Terminal.
At least 0.6 and later are "their own program" now - with a top-line
menu bar - and do not do that anymore.
It was designed to replace GNOME Terminal, which depends on the GNOME
libraries. Like GNOME Terminal, it is based on the VTE library.
Changing font-size in xfce terminal goes through the menu:
Preferences - Appearance
there you can change the font size (and font itself).

When you run xfce4-terminal _from_ another terminal window, you'll get
these kind of error messages for ctrl-+ and ctrl--:
(xfce4-terminal:25498): GLib-GObject-WARNING **: g_object_notify:
object class `TerminalWidget' has no property named `font-scale'
so the widget doesn't have a property to scale the font (anymore).

I've been using straight xterm for a terminal window in at least the
last few versions of xfce because of that:
Exec=xterm -geom 100x35 -title Local
(in one of the launchers for the bottom iconbar).
Xterm will react to ctrl-right_button with a pop-up menu for the font
scale (it has other menus too for ctrl-middle and ctrl-left but does
NOT have a in-window menu bar).
Clark Smith
2018-06-13 17:49:03 UTC
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The feedback that I got is that Ctrl-+ and Ctrl-- in the target
terminal window should do the trick, or, failing that, a right click in
the target terminal window should elicit a menu > containing Zoom
In/Zoom Out options.
As far as I know that was only in older versions of xfce4-terminal, when
that command still was a front-end for gnome Terminal.
At least 0.6 and later are "their own program" now - with a top-line
menu bar - and do not do that anymore.
It was designed to replace GNOME Terminal, which depends on the GNOME
libraries. Like GNOME Terminal, it is based on the VTE library.
Changing font-size in xfce terminal goes through the menu: Preferences -
Appearance there you can change the font size (and font itself).
When you run xfce4-terminal _from_ another terminal window, you'll get
(xfce4-terminal:25498): GLib-GObject-WARNING **: g_object_notify: object
class `TerminalWidget' has no property named `font-scale'
so the widget doesn't have a property to scale the font (anymore).
I've been using straight xterm for a terminal window in at least the
Exec=xterm -geom 100x35 -title Local (in one of the launchers for the
bottom iconbar).
Xterm will react to ctrl-right_button with a pop-up menu for the font
scale (it has other menus too for ctrl-middle and ctrl-left but does NOT
have a in-window menu bar).
Thanks for your reply. I am a bit stuck because I have to use a
terminal emulator that can display all sorts of scripts - which xfce4-
terminal can do, but xterm, not so well. E.g. I can configure xterm to
display many scripts, including Chinese, but not Arabic; or many scripts,
including Arabic, but not Chinese.

On the other hand, xfce4-terminal behaves in an undesirable (for
my needs) way when changing the font size from Preferences -> Appearance
- instead of applying the change just to the terminal window where you
actually made the change, it applies it to all current instances of xfce4-
terminal. While this may be appropriate in many cases, it is not in mine.
I have not been able to find a way to change this behavior :-(
Eef Hartman
2018-06-13 18:52:41 UTC
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Post by Clark Smith
On the other hand, xfce4-terminal behaves in an undesirable (for
my needs) way when changing the font size from Preferences -> Appearance
- instead of applying the change just to the terminal window where you
actually made the change, it applies it to all current instances of
xfce4-terminal. While this may be appropriate in many cases, it is not
in mine.
I wouldn't know about that, as I said, I normally do not use that
terminal emulator and in the test - with only a single xfce4-terminal
running - of course I didn't notice this.

I normally use xterm, rxvt or very rarely kde's konsole.

The original Terminal (gnome) of course isn't available anymore in
Slackware as Pat dropped gnome altogether.
BTW: the program used to be called xfterm4 when it was still a plain
script to front for another terminal emulator.
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-06-13 19:51:41 UTC
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Post by Clark Smith
Post by Eef Hartman
I've been using straight xterm for a terminal window in at least the
last few versions of xfce
I also have xterm as my prefered terminal emulator. It has done its job
well since I started with Slackware 3.0 and it has allways been there no
matter what window manager/desktop environment I have been using. During
the years I have used olwm, fwvm, fwvm95, gnome, kde and now in Slackware
14 xfce. But I still stick to good old xterm.
Post by Clark Smith
Thanks for your reply. I am a bit stuck because I have to use a
terminal emulator that can display all sorts of scripts
Would konsole be useful for that? In Slackware 14.2 I can choose konsole
as a terminal emulator in the xfce menus and it seems to me as that one
is able to change font size with ctrl-+ and ctrl--.

regards Henrik
Alexander Grotewohl
2018-06-13 20:46:25 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Clark Smith
Post by Eef Hartman
I've been using straight xterm for a terminal window in at least the
last few versions of xfce
I also have xterm as my prefered terminal emulator. It has done its job
well since I started with Slackware 3.0 and it has allways been there no
matter what window manager/desktop environment I have been using. During
the years I have used olwm, fwvm, fwvm95, gnome, kde and now in Slackware
14 xfce. But I still stick to good old xterm.
Post by Clark Smith
Thanks for your reply. I am a bit stuck because I have to use a
terminal emulator that can display all sorts of scripts
Would konsole be useful for that? In Slackware 14.2 I can choose konsole
as a terminal emulator in the xfce menus and it seems to me as that one
is able to change font size with ctrl-+ and ctrl--.
regards Henrik
Can confirm Konsole does work with ctrl-+ and ctrl--. Worth noting
though I had to choose a different font than what I normally use to get
it working, so it seems to be font specific. (My guess is the default
one which I no longer remember works out of the box)

I have only tested it extensively with English, Japanese and random
emoji fonts, so your mileage may vary.

Alex

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