Discussion:
When will Slackware offer an up to date Qt5?
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j***@wexfordpress.com
2018-04-07 16:26:40 UTC
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There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I use slackware
current.

I am trying to compile a program (Scribus 1.5.4) that lists the folLowing prerequisites:

Qt >= 5.5.0 (Scribus has specific code requiring Qt 5.5.0, not Qt 5.4.x or before)
Freetype >= 2.1.7 (2.3.x strongly recommended)
cairo >= 1.14.x
libtiff >= 3.6.0
LittleCMS (liblcms) >= 2.0 (2.1+ recommended)
libjpeg (depending on how Qt is packaged)
harfbuzz = > 0.9.42
libicu

Recommended:
CUPS
Fontconfig >= 2.0
LibXML2 >= 2.6.0
GhostScript >= 8.0 (9.0+ or greater preferred)
Python >= 2.3
tkinter for the font sampler script
python-imaging for the font sampler preview
pkgconfig (to assist finding other libraries)
hunspell for the spell checker
podofo - 0.7.0+ for enhanced Illustrator AI/EPS import, svn versions
boost and boost-devel
GraphicksMagick++


The most difficult is Qt5.7

John Culleton
root
2018-04-07 17:33:35 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I use slackware
current.
Qt >= 5.5.0 (Scribus has specific code requiring Qt 5.5.0, not Qt 5.4.x or before)
Freetype >= 2.1.7 (2.3.x strongly recommended)
cairo >= 1.14.x
libtiff >= 3.6.0
LittleCMS (liblcms) >= 2.0 (2.1+ recommended)
libjpeg (depending on how Qt is packaged)
harfbuzz = > 0.9.42
libicu
CUPS
Fontconfig >= 2.0
LibXML2 >= 2.6.0
GhostScript >= 8.0 (9.0+ or greater preferred)
Python >= 2.3
tkinter for the font sampler script
python-imaging for the font sampler preview
pkgconfig (to assist finding other libraries)
hunspell for the spell checker
podofo - 0.7.0+ for enhanced Illustrator AI/EPS import, svn versions
boost and boost-devel
GraphicksMagick++
The most difficult is Qt5.7
John Culleton
Install and configure slpkg. Then fetch Qt5-5.71 from slonly. On my
system I found:
Installing:
qt5-5.6.1 5.7.1 x86_64 10 slonly 63328 K
Installing for dependencies:
libxkbcommon-0.6.1 0.7.1 x86_64 1 slonly 236 K
libinput 1.8.3 x86_64 2 slonly 508 K

Took only a few minutes.

The command was:
slpkg -s slonly qt5
Rich
2018-04-08 14:28:26 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day
So what? It is not like you need to recompile it every second day.
You compile it once, you are done (until an upgrade to qt or
Slackware). It is also something you can 'nice -19' into the
background and go about using the rest of the system while it compiles.

Small tip if you are reinstalling your slackware multiple times, don't
compile qt multiple times. Compile it once, and keep the tgz install
file around. You can then reinstall your current slackware and simply
reinstall the already compiled qt5 tgz file.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt
compile.
Not relevant to qt5 at all. This is normal for *all* software (well,
all of life actually). If there are prerequisites and you don't have
them, then what you want to do will not likely be possible.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
I use slackware current.
It is not so much which version you use, but how often you try to
compile qt5. Keeping the tgz around will let you avoid several of
those recompiles.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
...
The most difficult is Qt5.7
No, likely just the one that takes the longest. Building from the SBo
file is two downloads, unpacking one tar.gz file, and running one
script. Hardly difficult in any way. Lengthy, yes, but not at all
difficult.

You've also been very cagey about the exact time you see (all day could
mean 24 hours or it could be relative to your personal preferences).

Compiling Qt5 on my dual cpu system in dual cpu compile mode takes 5.2
hours. A long time, yes, but certianly not something I'd consider
quite yet into the 'all day' realm. And I went about using the system
for other things, so an idle system (as in start the process at night,
let it run overnight) might have been somewhat faster).

And the time to compile can be 'adjusted' by what power system you are
willing to buy. A four, eight, sixteen, or thirty-two cpu system
should compile it much faster than a two cpu system. So you also have
the option of upgrading to a faster system to shrink the compile times.
Dan C
2018-04-08 17:16:03 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day
Perhaps you need a more modern/powerful system.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile.
No shit. That's true for any software.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
I use slackware current.
Perhaps you shouldn't be.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
Qt >= 5.5.0 (Scribus has specific code requiring Qt 5.5.0, not Qt
5.4.x
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
or before)
Freetype >= 2.1.7 (2.3.x strongly recommended)
cairo >= 1.14.x libtiff >= 3.6.0 LittleCMS (liblcms) >= 2.0 (2.1+
recommended)
libjpeg (depending on how Qt is packaged)
harfbuzz = > 0.9.42 libicu
CUPS Fontconfig >= 2.0 LibXML2 >= 2.6.0 GhostScript >= 8.0 (9.0+ or
greater preferred)
Python >= 2.3 tkinter for the font sampler script python-imaging
for
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
the font sampler preview pkgconfig (to assist finding other
libraries)
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
hunspell for the spell checker podofo - 0.7.0+ for enhanced
Illustrator
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
AI/EPS import, svn versions boost and boost-devel GraphicksMagick++
The most difficult is Qt5.7
John Culleton
Perhaps if you quit complaining about nothing, you'd have it finished
already.

<BOGGLE>
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he cut his initials in the snow.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: Loading Image...
Ralph Spitzner
2018-04-09 06:01:50 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
The most difficult is Qt5.7
As it says it needs >= 5.7, I recently compiled qt5.9.4 using icecc
running on 4 machines. Still took abeout 4 hrs.
You have to edit the slackbuild, to adjust
'make -j<whatevercores/jobs>'.

If you want everything done for you use Ubuntu or any other debian.


-rasp
j***@wexfordpress.com
2018-04-09 19:01:07 UTC
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Post by Ralph Spitzner
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
The most difficult is Qt5.7
As it says it needs >= 5.7, I recently compiled qt5.9.4 using icecc
running on 4 machines. Still took abeout 4 hrs.
You have to edit the slackbuild, to adjust
'make -j<whatevercores/jobs>'.
If you want everything done for you use Ubuntu or any other debian.
-rasp
No, but I want a reasonable set of tools to handle the compile of the latest overnight source code of a certain application.

what is icecc?
Dan C
2018-04-10 03:14:05 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
Post by Ralph Spitzner
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
The most difficult is Qt5.7
As it says it needs >= 5.7, I recently compiled qt5.9.4 using icecc
running on 4 machines. Still took abeout 4 hrs.
You have to edit the slackbuild, to adjust 'make
-j<whatevercores/jobs>'.
If you want everything done for you use Ubuntu or any other debian.
-rasp
No, but I want a reasonable set of tools to handle the compile of the
latest overnight source code of a certain application.
You don't have a "reasonable set of tools" with Slackware?

What exactly are you missing?

I'm thinking maybe you *SHOULD* be running Ubuntu or similar. Or Windoze.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he stepped into the acceleration chamber.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Ed Wilson
2018-04-10 15:01:44 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
Post by Ralph Spitzner
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
The most difficult is Qt5.7
As it says it needs >= 5.7, I recently compiled qt5.9.4 using icecc
running on 4 machines. Still took abeout 4 hrs.
You have to edit the slackbuild, to adjust
'make -j<whatevercores/jobs>'.
If you want everything done for you use Ubuntu or any other debian.
-rasp
No, but I want a reasonable set of tools to handle the compile of the
latest overnight source code of a certain application.
what is icecc?
How much is changing every night?

I would suggest reading the man pages for distcc and ccache. Both programs
are designed to speed up compile times in different ways and are included in
Slackware.

--
Ed Wilson
Ralph Spitzner
2018-04-11 11:06:13 UTC
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***@wexfordpress.com wrote on 04/09/2018 09:01 PM:
[....]
e set of tools to handle the compile of the latest overnight source code
of a certain application.
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
what is icecc?
icecc is somewhat similar to distcc, except it does not require
identical comilers on all machines and is able to compile the kernel aswell.

ccache is useful for qt5 as there are many compilations (compiles?) of
the same file in webkit.

basically ccache checks whether the file is the same and already
compiled, if not it delegates to icecc, which in turn assigns jobs
to the available machines.

-rasp
--
No signature available.
Jens Stuckelberger
2018-04-11 14:14:14 UTC
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Post by Ralph Spitzner
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
The most difficult is Qt5.7
As it says it needs >= 5.7, I recently compiled qt5.9.4 using icecc
running on 4 machines. Still took abeout 4 hrs.
You have to edit the slackbuild, to adjust 'make
-j<whatevercores/jobs>'.
On this subject, anybody know why it takes such a long time to
build QT5? According to what I read '[QT5] enables developers to develop
applications with intuitive user interfaces for multiple targets, faster
than ever before." Nice, but it's not like it is an operating system or
anything like that.

Why does it take hours to build QT5 while, in the same system,
one can build a fully functional Linux kernel, with lots of bells and
whistles, in a small fraction of that time?
Ralph Spitzner
2018-04-12 10:31:42 UTC
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Jens Stuckelberger wrote on 04/11/2018 04:14 PM:
[...]
Post by Jens Stuckelberger
On this subject, anybody know why it takes such a long time to
build QT5? According to what I read '[QT5] enables developers to develop
[...]


Well you basically build a whole infrastructure of things, like
a browser (webkit), videoplayer, text editor et al.

Then there's all the GUI stuff, wich is supposed to look alike on all
platforms.

Building openoffice, godzilla or X11 also takes much longer than the kernel.

It simply is 'more lines', and most of it is C++ not C, so you haul in
a truckload of code by using/extending some 'Class', which in turn uses
another, that uses another.....

[that's where ccache is useful]

-rasp
Rich
2018-04-15 19:33:02 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and
if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile.
I use slackware current.
John,

I just discovered this site:

https://slackonly.com/

It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.

Including qt5.
Dan C
2018-04-16 02:44:07 UTC
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Post by Rich
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and
if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I
use slackware current.
John,
https://slackonly.com/
It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.
Including qt5.
Well, now you've done it.

What's he gonna bitch about now? You've ruined him. :)
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he put Spanish Fly in Christopher Robin's drink.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Rich
2018-04-16 11:37:04 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Rich
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day
and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt
compile. I use slackware current.
John,
https://slackonly.com/
It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.
Including qt5.
Well, now you've done it.
What's he gonna bitch about now? You've ruined him. :)
Well, yeah, but....

Reading his postings, it sounded like he planned to make modifications
to the Scribus source to contribute to the project. A nobile goal in
an of itself.

But my next thought was that if he was this amateur at installing qt5,
then I fear for the Scribus maintainers when they see his contributed
code. I.e., if he is honestly skilled enough to add features to
Scribus, then none of these complaints should have even been posted
here, because they would never have been an issue for him in the first
place. So these complaints imply a serious lack of skill at this time
towards his intended goal.
jrg
2018-04-17 21:47:26 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Rich
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and
if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I
use slackware current.
John,
https://slackonly.com/
It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.
Including qt5.
Well, now you've done it.
What's he gonna bitch about now? You've ruined him. :)
Theres always TeX
j***@wexfordpress.com
2018-05-06 22:29:15 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Rich
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and
if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I
use slackware current.
John,
https://slackonly.com/
It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.
Including qt5.
Well, now you've done it.
What's he gonna bitch about now? You've ruined him. :)
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he put Spanish Fly in Christopher Robin's drink.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
I downloaded Qt5 from its home site and installed it,
The latest version of Scribus compiled correctly from source.

But like all other recent versions of Scribus on execution it showed "Segmentation Fault".
I did everything as root.

So back I go to Fedora for this app. In my years with Slack (since the days of
5 inch floppies) I never had this much trouble with compiling and using an app.
Sylvain Robitaille
2018-05-07 14:56:21 UTC
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... In my years with Slack (since the days of 5 inch floppies)
I never had this much trouble with compiling and using an app.
Um ... so how many "5 inch floppies" did you *ever* get Slackware on???
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sylvain Robitaille ***@encs.concordia.ca

Systems analyst / AITS Concordia University
Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science Montreal, Quebec, Canada
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Dan C
2018-05-08 15:03:21 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
Post by Dan C
Post by Rich
Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day
and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt
compile. I use slackware current.
John,
https://slackonly.com/
It contains pre-compiled binaries of SlackBuild script items.
Including qt5.
Well, now you've done it.
What's he gonna bitch about now? You've ruined him. :)
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he put Spanish Fly in Christopher Robin's drink.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
I downloaded Qt5 from its home site and installed it,
The latest version of Scribus compiled correctly from source.
But like all other recent versions of Scribus on execution it showed "Segmentation Fault".
I did everything as root.
So back I go to Fedora for this app. In my years with Slack (since the
days of 5 inch floppies) I never had this much trouble with compiling
and using an app.
Yeah.... I'm thinking perhaps you should just stick with Fedora.

Or maybe Ubuntu. See sig line below.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as the woodpecker approached his hot-air balloon.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
j***@wexfordpress.com
2018-05-10 15:02:29 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
There is a version on Slackbuild but building it takes a full day and if you don't have the prerequisites loaded first it won'rt compile. I use slackware
current.
Qt >= 5.5.0 (Scribus has specific code requiring Qt 5.5.0, not Qt 5.4.x or before)
Freetype >= 2.1.7 (2.3.x strongly recommended)
cairo >= 1.14.x
libtiff >= 3.6.0
LittleCMS (liblcms) >= 2.0 (2.1+ recommended)
libjpeg (depending on how Qt is packaged)
harfbuzz = > 0.9.42
libicu
CUPS
Fontconfig >= 2.0
LibXML2 >= 2.6.0
GhostScript >= 8.0 (9.0+ or greater preferred)
Python >= 2.3
tkinter for the font sampler script
python-imaging for the font sampler preview
pkgconfig (to assist finding other libraries)
hunspell for the spell checker
podofo - 0.7.0+ for enhanced Illustrator AI/EPS import, svn versions
boost and boost-devel
GraphicksMagick++
The most difficult is Qt5.7
John Culleton
j***@wexfordpress.com
2018-05-10 16:26:08 UTC
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To answer all your questions:
Actually I don''t remember how many 5 inch floppies. More recently I used a set of about 18 3.5 inch floppies. And of course in recent times I have used cds and even more recently dvd's.

I have tried all the other linux versions suggested by others but I feel most at ease with Slackware.

I have used several versions of Tex including the original product. When I was active typesetting and indexing books I tended to use the eplain version and more recently the Context version. For one customer I used LaTeX and the Memoir class when it seemed most appropriate.

With respect to Scribus which I have used mainly for cover design I would like to program a working TOC facility and also an indexing facility. I also plan to reissue my pdf book on using Scribus for cover design.

Most of my programming work has been done in various versions of COBOL. Twice I shook hands with the woman who invented COBOL, Grace Murray Hopper. But I have done work in RPG when required by management to use that language. I have fiddled with Perl, Python and Tcl/Tk

Id you visit my web page wexfordpress.com you can see an example of my work in web page design.

Perhaps my reach exceeds my grasp. But at age 85 I intend to live until they plant me, and work until Parkinson's cripples me entirely.

Thanks to all who replied.

John Culleton
Jens Stuckelberger
2018-05-10 18:00:19 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
Perhaps my reach exceeds my grasp. But at age 85 I intend to live until
they plant me, and work until Parkinson's cripples me entirely.
A tip of the hat to you, sir.
jrg
2018-05-10 18:50:50 UTC
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Post by j***@wexfordpress.com
But at age 85
No surprise there since you mention using RPG :)
Sylvain Robitaille
2018-05-11 16:45:23 UTC
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Actually I don''t remember how many 5 inch floppies. ...
I'm going to suggest that your memory perhaps fails you here. Your
computer perhaps had a 5-1/4" floppy disk drive in it, but it most
certainly also had a 3-1/2" floppy drive. Slackware was originally
released on 1.44MB (3-1/2") floppy disk images. You wouldn't have
gotten these onto 5-1/4" disks in any usable form.

see http://www.slackware.com/announce/1.0.php for the original
announcement.
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sylvain Robitaille ***@encs.concordia.ca

Systems analyst / AITS Concordia University
Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science Montreal, Quebec, Canada
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Petri Kaukasoina
2018-05-18 11:35:01 UTC
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Post by Sylvain Robitaille
Actually I don''t remember how many 5 inch floppies. ...
I'm going to suggest that your memory perhaps fails you here. Your
computer perhaps had a 5-1/4" floppy disk drive in it, but it most
certainly also had a 3-1/2" floppy drive. Slackware was originally
released on 1.44MB (3-1/2") floppy disk images. You wouldn't have
gotten these onto 5-1/4" disks in any usable form.
A copy of https://mirrors.slackware.com/slackware/slackware-1.1.2/5_25.rme follows...


Instructions for installing Slackware on machines with a 5.25" boot drive
and a 3.5" second floppy drive.
---------------

5.25" boot drives have been well supported since version 1.1.1. It is possible
to install on a machine that has only a 5.25" drive. Note however, that this
doesn't mean it will be as easy as installing from 3.5", but if you install off
of your hard drive it may actually be easier.

The first 3 disks of Slackware Linux, the A disks, should all fit within
1.2M. To install them, you'll need a boot kernel, and a rootdisk. These can
be found under bootdisk/1_2meg. Read the README file in the bootdisk
directory, it gives more information about the new bootdisks.

To make the boot kernel disk, copy the boot kernel of your choice to a floppy
using dd or RAWWRITE.EXE.

To make the root disk, write color12 or tty12 to a floppy in the same way.

Use the boot kernel disk to boot the rootdisk (color12 or tty12), and install
from there. This will load the ramdisk. Once you have the "darkstar:" prompt
you may remove the disk from your machine and continue with the installation.

Once you've got the base system installed, you can install the rest of the
disks by downloaded them on to your harddrive and installing them from there.
Disk series other than A won't wit onto 1.2M disks.

I sincerely hope this helps!

---
Patrick Volkerding
***@ftp.cdrom.com
***@mhd1.moorhead.msus.edu
Alexander Grotewohl
2018-05-18 15:13:40 UTC
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Post by Petri Kaukasoina
Post by Sylvain Robitaille
Actually I don''t remember how many 5 inch floppies. ...
I'm going to suggest that your memory perhaps fails you here. Your
computer perhaps had a 5-1/4" floppy disk drive in it, but it most
certainly also had a 3-1/2" floppy drive. Slackware was originally
released on 1.44MB (3-1/2") floppy disk images. You wouldn't have
gotten these onto 5-1/4" disks in any usable form.
Once you've got the base system installed, you can install the rest of the
disks by downloaded them on to your harddrive and installing them from there.
Disk series other than A won't wit onto 1.2M disks.
So the answer is.. 4 disks? After which somehow the rest got installed.
Eef Hartman
2018-05-19 00:29:09 UTC
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Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Post by Petri Kaukasoina
Disk series other than A won't wit onto 1.2M disks.
So the answer is.. 4 disks? After which somehow the rest got installed.
5 disks: boot, root and A1 thru A3

From the READ.ME in slackware-1.1.2/bootdisk/1_2meg:
You will need at least one bootkernel, and one rootdisk.

These are bootkernels:

-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 248343 Feb 5 01:27 bareboot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551447 Feb 5 01:28 cd_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 513597 Feb 5 01:29 net_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 492767 Feb 11 15:14 onlyscsi.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551839 Feb 11 15:16 scsiboot.gz

This is the rootdisk:

-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 408109 Feb 5 01:31 tty12.gz

BTW: it _was_ possible to put both a boot and the root disk on the
same floppy, they're small enough for that (at that time), but you
have to trick it a little (hardcode the root filename into the boot
kernel). By default it took the FIRST file on each of both floppies.

And to "install the rest" you could use the net_boot or (if you did
have a CDrom drive) cd_boot kernel, I believe (been a LONG time since
I did that, 1.1.2 was my first Slackware too, in 1994).
Alexander Grotewohl
2018-05-19 14:58:01 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Post by Petri Kaukasoina
Disk series other than A won't wit onto 1.2M disks.
So the answer is.. 4 disks? After which somehow the rest got installed.
5 disks: boot, root and A1 thru A3
You will need at least one bootkernel, and one rootdisk.
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 248343 Feb 5 01:27 bareboot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551447 Feb 5 01:28 cd_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 513597 Feb 5 01:29 net_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 492767 Feb 11 15:14 onlyscsi.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551839 Feb 11 15:16 scsiboot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 408109 Feb 5 01:31 tty12.gz
BTW: it _was_ possible to put both a boot and the root disk on the
same floppy, they're small enough for that (at that time), but you
have to trick it a little (hardcode the root filename into the boot
kernel). By default it took the FIRST file on each of both floppies.
And to "install the rest" you could use the net_boot or (if you did
have a CDrom drive) cd_boot kernel, I believe (been a LONG time since
I did that, 1.1.2 was my first Slackware too, in 1994).
Interesting. Wish I had an older machine like that to try it out on.
Rich
2018-05-19 15:11:06 UTC
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Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Post by Eef Hartman
Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Post by Petri Kaukasoina
Disk series other than A won't wit onto 1.2M disks.
So the answer is.. 4 disks? After which somehow the rest got installed.
5 disks: boot, root and A1 thru A3
You will need at least one bootkernel, and one rootdisk.
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 248343 Feb 5 01:27 bareboot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551447 Feb 5 01:28 cd_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 513597 Feb 5 01:29 net_boot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 492767 Feb 11 15:14 onlyscsi.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 551839 Feb 11 15:16 scsiboot.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 volkerdi 408109 Feb 5 01:31 tty12.gz
BTW: it _was_ possible to put both a boot and the root disk on the
same floppy, they're small enough for that (at that time), but you
have to trick it a little (hardcode the root filename into the boot
kernel). By default it took the FIRST file on each of both floppies.
And to "install the rest" you could use the net_boot or (if you did
have a CDrom drive) cd_boot kernel, I believe (been a LONG time since
I did that, 1.1.2 was my first Slackware too, in 1994).
Interesting. Wish I had an older machine like that to try it out on.
The files, if you can find a complete set, will likely boot inside of a
VirtualBox VM (or vmware or other if you like). Granted, it would not
be quite the same as using an actual machine from the time, but
boot/install to a VM might work.
Eef Hartman
2018-05-25 11:36:40 UTC
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Post by Rich
Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Interesting. Wish I had an older machine like that to try it out on.
The files, if you can find a complete set, will likely boot inside of a
VirtualBox VM (or vmware or other if you like).
Complete sets of older Slackware releases can be found i.e. on
https://mirrors.slackware.com/slackware
(the 1.01 release seems to be incomplete, only the "a*" sets are
there, but the 1.1.2 one has got more then 50 "disk set" subdirs,
looks to be complete).
Slackware 1.1.2 happened to be my first version too, I remember how
much work it was to download and put to floppy all of those separate
sets of files (although I do not remember the oi (Object Interface)
ones and they're not mentioned in the readme).

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