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Installation of old version of Slackware under Virualbox
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jjge
2018-08-14 12:01:12 UTC
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Hello,

after reading the recent discussions I decided to try the first version
of Slackware, from the InfoMagic CD-ROM set of October 1994.
I made a file for the boot disk (bare-boot144.img), and I tried two
different root disks (color144.img and umsds144.img).
The extension "img" has been added for VBox to find the images.
On starting, I found that the HD controller had too many heads for the
(simulated) BIOS, but the CD-ROM also had a file EIDE.TXT detailing how
to go ahead: ramdisk hd=520,16,63

Now I get at least something, but:
/bin does not have some essential files, including fdisk, which I would
need to format the HD.
Several other files are also missing, e.g. more.
mount is a link to /etc/mount, and if I enter mount, I get a display of
the images mountd ( / and /dev/fd0 ).

Because I had no fdisk, I mounted the hda device on another Linux
vertual machine (Linux 7, also a fairly ancient version). Here I could
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.

However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."

So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very useful
yet. And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone have an
idea to proceed?

The Linux version is 1.0.9
Eef Hartman
2018-08-14 12:27:57 UTC
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Post by jjge
/bin does not have some essential files, including fdisk, which I would
need to format the HD.
Should be in /sbin (system binaries) like other root-only utils.
Post by jjge
Several other files are also missing, e.g. more.
If present should be in /usr/bin (as is less).
There essentially are 4 "bin" directories, /bin and /usr/bin for all
users, /sbin and /usr/sbin for root/system applications.
The ram disk may have not all of the available utils present as to
save on RAM space used, but /bin and /sbin should be there.
This old a distribution may also have some system utils yet in /etc
(like the mount you mentioned).
Post by jjge
the images mountd ( / and /dev/fd0 ).
And _what_ is mounted to /, the hard disk or a ram disk img?
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Probably means its entry in the /etc/fstab has a different fs than the
one you formatted it to. Remember that slw 1.0.9 doesn't know ext4
(etc.) yet.
Create a directory /mnt/hd (if not already present) and then try
mount -t ext3 /dev/hda1 /mnt/hd
jjge
2018-08-14 12:44:49 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
/bin does not have some essential files, including fdisk, which I would
need to format the HD.
Should be in /sbin (system binaries) like other root-only utils.
Post by jjge
Several other files are also missing, e.g. more.
If present should be in /usr/bin (as is less).
There essentially are 4 "bin" directories, /bin and /usr/bin for all
users, /sbin and /usr/sbin for root/system applications.
unfortunately, /sbin and /usr are missing
Post by Eef Hartman
The ram disk may have not all of the available utils present as to
save on RAM space used, but /bin and /sbin should be there.
This old a distribution may also have some system utils yet in /etc
(like the mount you mentioned).
Right, quite a few, indeed.
Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
the images mountd ( / and /dev/fd0 ).
And _what_ is mounted to /, the hard disk or a ram disk img?
/dev/fd0 (the ramdisk image)
Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Probably means its entry in the /etc/fstab has a different fs than the
one you formatted it to. Remember that slw 1.0.9 doesn't know ext4
(etc.) yet.
That is why I tried to format the HD (on a different Slack version) to
msdos (which did not work either)
Post by Eef Hartman
Create a directory /mnt/hd (if not already present) and then try
mount -t ext3 /dev/hda1 /mnt/hd
Surprise: type ext3 not supported by kernel (well, it is a very old
one). However type ext2 gives the usual message (wrong fs type and the
rest). And the /proc directory is present, but it has no entry "filesystems"
Eef Hartman
2018-08-14 13:09:37 UTC
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Post by jjge
That is why I tried to format the HD (on a different Slack version) to
msdos (which did not work either)
Then you would have needed -t umsdos (note: NOT vfat!).
umsdos is Unix extensions to a MS-Dos (fat12 or 16, not 32 yet) fs.
Current kernels do not support it anymore.
Post by jjge
Surprise: type ext3 not supported by kernel (well, it is a very old
one). However type ext2 gives the usual message (wrong fs type and the
You will have to reformat (mke2fs) /dev/hda1 to type ext2 then.
jjge
2018-08-14 13:33:57 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
That is why I tried to format the HD (on a different Slack version) to
msdos (which did not work either)
Then you would have needed -t umsdos (note: NOT vfat!).
umsdos is Unix extensions to a MS-Dos (fat12 or 16, not 32 yet) fs.
Current kernels do not support it anymore.
Ha, yes, I remember now. I had tried -t msdos, but that did not work.
However:
mount -t umsdos /dev/hda1 /mnt
yields:
MSDOS bread failed
UMSDOS Alpha 0.3
wrong fs type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy, or other error

So it is at least doing something, but eventually fails...
Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
Surprise: type ext3 not supported by kernel (well, it is a very old
one). However type ext2 gives the usual message (wrong fs type and the
You will have to reformat (mke2fs) /dev/hda1 to type ext2 then.
Tried that too: I get "cannot read superblock" ...
Eef Hartman
2018-08-14 14:55:50 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by Eef Hartman
You will have to reformat (mke2fs) /dev/hda1 to type ext2 then.
Tried that too: I get "cannot read superblock" ...
Did you explicitly ask for ext2? As you formatted on a newer system
ext3 may have been the default.

But I guess this version is just too old (and too incomplete).
You may want to try Slackware 1.1.2 instead, that one at least
is complete. You can find it at url
mirrors.slackware.com/slackware/slackware-1.1.2/

You will have to create (pseudo) floppies for the boot- and rootdisks
(see the subdir bootdisk/1_44meg) and then install the rest through
the separate disk sets.
jjge
2018-08-14 15:11:07 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by jjge
Post by Eef Hartman
You will have to reformat (mke2fs) /dev/hda1 to type ext2 then.
Tried that too: I get "cannot read superblock" ...
Did you explicitly ask for ext2? As you formatted on a newer system
ext3 may have been the default.
But I guess this version is just too old (and too incomplete).
You may want to try Slackware 1.1.2 instead, that one at least
is complete. You can find it at url
mirrors.slackware.com/slackware/slackware-1.1.2/
You will have to create (pseudo) floppies for the boot- and rootdisks
(see the subdir bootdisk/1_44meg) and then install the rest through
the separate disk sets.
Well, it has worked, back in 1994. It was slow (I had only 4M of RAM)
but it did work... But it may be that Vbox is too new for it...
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-08-15 06:26:54 UTC
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Post by jjge
On starting, I found that the HD controller had too many heads for the
(simulated) BIOS, but the CD-ROM also had a file EIDE.TXT detailing how
to go ahead: ramdisk hd=520,16,63
Because I had no fdisk, I mounted the hda device on another Linux
vertual machine (Linux 7, also a fairly ancient version). Here I could
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Are you sure that both machines agree on the geometry of the disk? If
they have different view of the geometry that might explain why a file
system created on one machine is unusable on the other machine.

It was a long time since I last installed Slackware from floppies. But if
important utilities are missing from your installation root file system I
would start by trying to extract the root file system from the floppy and
tro to examine it. If I remember right I used to use the color root file
system for my Slackware installations, but I started with Slackware 3.0.

regards Henrik
jjge
2018-08-15 07:17:06 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by jjge
On starting, I found that the HD controller had too many heads for the
(simulated) BIOS, but the CD-ROM also had a file EIDE.TXT detailing how
to go ahead: ramdisk hd=520,16,63
Because I had no fdisk, I mounted the hda device on another Linux
vertual machine (Linux 7, also a fairly ancient version). Here I could
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Are you sure that both machines agree on the geometry of the disk? If
they have different view of the geometry that might explain why a file
system created on one machine is unusable on the other machine.
Well, I am more or less sure they don't... At startup, I have to give in
a set of parameters about the disk to lie about the number of heads.
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
It was a long time since I last installed Slackware from floppies. But if
important utilities are missing from your installation root file system I
would start by trying to extract the root file system from the floppy and
tro to examine it. If I remember right I used to use the color root file
system for my Slackware installations, but I started with Slackware 3.0.
Well, I just took the images from the CD-ROM, and I mount them on the
VBox as floppy images. That works, and at least some utilities become
visible. Others don't. But I cannot really think of many geometries for
floppies... you had 1.2M and 1.44M.

Well, I will occasionally try again, but of course I am not planning to
do anything important with this version. Just wondering why it did work
on my old 486 with 4M RAM...
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
regards Henrik
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-08-16 06:03:07 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
It was a long time since I last installed Slackware from floppies. But
if important utilities are missing from your installation root file
system I would start by trying to extract the root file system from the
floppy and tro to examine it. If I remember right I used to use the
color root file system for my Slackware installations, but I started
with Slackware 3.0.
Well, I just took the images from the CD-ROM, and I mount them on the
VBox as floppy images. That works, and at least some utilities become
visible. Others don't. But I cannot really think of many geometries for
floppies... you had 1.2M and 1.44M.
If I remember right, to install Slackware from boot floppies, you first
booted from the boot floppy. That floppy contained an image of the kernel
which loaded and then prompted you to replace the boot floppy with the
root floppy which contained an image of a compressed root file system.

regards Henrik
jjge
2018-08-16 08:33:14 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by jjge
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
It was a long time since I last installed Slackware from floppies. But
if important utilities are missing from your installation root file
system I would start by trying to extract the root file system from the
floppy and tro to examine it. If I remember right I used to use the
color root file system for my Slackware installations, but I started
with Slackware 3.0.
Well, I just took the images from the CD-ROM, and I mount them on the
VBox as floppy images. That works, and at least some utilities become
visible. Others don't. But I cannot really think of many geometries for
floppies... you had 1.2M and 1.44M.
If I remember right, to install Slackware from boot floppies, you first
booted from the boot floppy. That floppy contained an image of the kernel
which loaded and then prompted you to replace the boot floppy with the
root floppy which contained an image of a compressed root file system.
regards Henrik
Correct. The bootdisk runs, then it tells me to change disks;
fortunately I can "mount" the other image on the other "interface"
(changing "floppies" is fairly roundabout on VBox). The root disk
(umsdos or color144) then runs OK, except for some messages saying that
several utilities are missing... but the rootdisk itself is mounted, and
some utilities _are_ available.
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-08-17 05:53:28 UTC
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The root disk (umsdos or color144) then runs OK, except for some
messages saying that several utilities are missing... but the rootdisk
itself is mounted, and some utilities _are_ available.
I would take that floppy image on a some Linux installation to uncompress
it and mount the uncompressed image as a loop device to examine its
contents. Are those files really missing on that file system? If so your
root disks are broken. You could also compare the size of the root disk
with the sizes of other Slackware root disks from that era.

regards Henrik
jjge
2018-08-17 07:56:04 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
The root disk (umsdos or color144) then runs OK, except for some
messages saying that several utilities are missing... but the rootdisk
itself is mounted, and some utilities _are_ available.
I would take that floppy image on a some Linux installation to uncompress
it and mount the uncompressed image as a loop device to examine its
contents. Are those files really missing on that file system? If so your
root disks are broken. You could also compare the size of the root disk
with the sizes of other Slackware root disks from that era.
regards Henrik
That is a good suggestion. I followed it, and lo and behold! the missing
files (fdisk) and directories (/usr) were present. Now I have to find
out, why VBox does not see them...
jjge
2018-08-17 10:57:30 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
The root disk (umsdos or color144) then runs OK, except for some
messages saying that several utilities are missing... but the rootdisk
itself is mounted, and some utilities _are_ available.
I would take that floppy image on a some Linux installation to uncompress
it and mount the uncompressed image as a loop device to examine its
contents. Are those files really missing on that file system? If so your
root disks are broken. You could also compare the size of the root disk
with the sizes of other Slackware root disks from that era.
regards Henrik
That is a good suggestion. I followed it, and lo and behold! the missing
files (fdisk) and directories (/usr) were present. Now I have to find
out, why VBox does not see them...
vboxmanage showmediuminfo gives the size as 1Mbyte. That would
definitely account for the missing files!
Unfortunately, the --resize option is not yet implemented :-(
Aelius Gallus
2018-08-24 02:07:31 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by jjge
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
The root disk (umsdos or color144) then runs OK, except for some
messages saying that several utilities are missing... but the rootdisk
itself is mounted, and some utilities _are_ available.
I would take that floppy image on a some Linux installation to uncompress
it and mount the uncompressed image as a loop device to examine its
contents. Are those files really missing on that file system? If so your
root disks are broken. You could also compare the size of the root disk
with the sizes of other Slackware root disks from that era.
regards Henrik
That is a good suggestion. I followed it, and lo and behold! the missing
files (fdisk) and directories (/usr) were present. Now I have to find
out, why VBox does not see them...
vboxmanage showmediuminfo gives the size as 1Mbyte. That would
definitely account for the missing files!
Unfortunately, the --resize option is not yet implemented :-(
Fascinating! Running Kernel-1.0.9, must be like driving a classic car,
I suppose. The oldest Linux I have is also from Walnut Creek CDROM and
it contains a 1.1 kernel from Yggdrasil and I remember I couldn't manage to
install it in a desktop harddisk.
Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
2018-08-15 04:24:11 UTC
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Groovy hepcat jjge was jivin' in alt.os.linux.slackware on Tue, 14 Aug
2018 10:01 pm. It's a cool scene! Dig it.
Post by jjge
after reading the recent discussions I decided to try the first
version of Slackware, from the InfoMagic CD-ROM set of October 1994.
Ah! I love tinkering with old systems. I have Slackware 3.4 from
circa '98 or so on a 386, and play around with it now & then.
Post by jjge
I made a file for the boot disk (bare-boot144.img), and I tried two
different root disks (color144.img and umsds144.img).
The extension "img" has been added for VBox to find the images.
On starting, I found that the HD controller had too many heads for the
(simulated) BIOS, but the CD-ROM also had a file EIDE.TXT detailing
how to go ahead: ramdisk hd=520,16,63
/bin does not have some essential files, including fdisk, which I
would need to format the HD.
Several other files are also missing, e.g. more.
mount is a link to /etc/mount, and if I enter mount, I get a display
of the images mountd ( / and /dev/fd0 ).
Because I had no fdisk, I mounted the hda device on another Linux
vertual machine (Linux 7, also a fairly ancient version). Here I could
There's no such thing as "Linux 7". Do you mean Slackware 7?
Post by jjge
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
Why use that filesystem? You could use umsdos, of course, but I never
saw the point. It should be ext2, IMHO.
Of course, you should remember that the early version of ext2 in
kernel 1.0.9 doesn't support all the options that ext2 in the 2.6
series (as in Slackware 7) supports; and I don't just mean journaling.
Sou you should look up the mkfs.ext2 man page, especially the -O
(that's a capital o) option. I don't know what options are not
supported by 1.0.9, but you could probably google it, I suppose.
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Elsewhere in this thread you mentioned you were trying to mount it
with msdos instead of umsdos, but even when you changed that it still
didn't work. Sorry! I can't help with that. I've never used umsdos.
Is it possible that the version of mount you're using doesn't support
(u)msdos? No, of course the umsds144.img should do it. It was just a
thought.
Post by jjge
So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very useful
yet. And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone have an
idea to proceed?
The Linux version is 1.0.9
So, the Slackware version would be, according to Wikipedia, 2.0,
right? I'm downloading it now to try it out. I'll try it with qemu and
let you know how it goes in a few days.
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-------------- Shaggy was here! ---------------
Ain't I'm a dawg!!
jjge
2018-08-16 05:50:41 UTC
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On 08/15/2018 06:24 AM, Peter "Shaggy" Haywood wrote:
[...]
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
There's no such thing as "Linux 7". Do you mean Slackware 7?
I stand corrected. Yes. I use it occasionally to run the last available
WordPerfect, under a now-defunct libc version.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Post by jjge
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
Why use that filesystem? You could use umsdos, of course, but I never
saw the point. It should be ext2, IMHO.
Well, I tried almost all possibilities, including ext2.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Of course, you should remember that the early version of ext2 in
kernel 1.0.9 doesn't support all the options that ext2 in the 2.6
series (as in Slackware 7) supports; and I don't just mean journaling.
Sou you should look up the mkfs.ext2 man page, especially the -O
(that's a capital o) option. I don't know what options are not
supported by 1.0.9, but you could probably google it, I suppose.
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Elsewhere in this thread you mentioned you were trying to mount it
with msdos instead of umsdos, but even when you changed that it still
didn't work. Sorry! I can't help with that. I've never used umsdos.
Is it possible that the version of mount you're using doesn't support
(u)msdos? No, of course the umsds144.img should do it. It was just a
thought.
Post by jjge
So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very useful
yet. And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone have an
idea to proceed?
The Linux version is 1.0.9
So, the Slackware version would be, according to Wikipedia, 2.0,
right? I'm downloading it now to try it out. I'll try it with qemu and
let you know how it goes in a few days.
Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
2018-08-18 06:42:32 UTC
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Groovy hepcat jjge was jivin' in alt.os.linux.slackware on Thu, 16 Aug
2018 3:50 pm. It's a cool scene! Dig it.
Post by jjge
[...]
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
There's no such thing as "Linux 7". Do you mean Slackware 7?
I stand corrected. Yes. I use it occasionally to run the last
available WordPerfect, under a now-defunct libc version.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Post by jjge
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
Why use that filesystem? You could use umsdos, of course, but I never
saw the point. It should be ext2, IMHO.
Well, I tried almost all possibilities, including ext2.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Of course, you should remember that the early version of ext2 in
kernel 1.0.9 doesn't support all the options that ext2 in the 2.6
series (as in Slackware 7) supports; and I don't just mean
journaling. Sou you should look up the mkfs.ext2 man page, especially
the -O (that's a capital o) option. I don't know what options are not
supported by 1.0.9, but you could probably google it, I suppose.
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Elsewhere in this thread you mentioned you were trying to mount it
with msdos instead of umsdos, but even when you changed that it still
didn't work. Sorry! I can't help with that. I've never used umsdos.
Is it possible that the version of mount you're using doesn't support
(u)msdos? No, of course the umsds144.img should do it. It was just a
thought.
Post by jjge
So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very
useful yet. And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone
have an idea to proceed?
The Linux version is 1.0.9
So, the Slackware version would be, according to Wikipedia, 2.0,
right? I'm downloading it now to try it out. I'll try it with qemu
and let you know how it goes in a few days.
Oh yeah, another thing I forgot to mention. Your problem getting your
hard drive partition recognised might be solved by passing a "hd="
option to your kernel. Insert the (virtual) boot diskette in the
(virtual) floppy drive and boot the (virtual) machine. Before it loads
the kernel it'll prompt for command line args. You need to determine
your drive geometry in CHS (cylinders - heads - sectors per track)
format. Enter the following at the prompt:

ramdisk hd=1024,16,63

substituting your drive geometry (where 1024 is the number of cylinders,
16 is the number of heads and 63 is the number of sectors per track).
Hit enter/return, and continue the installation as usual. In the lilo
setup, add something like the following line:

append hd=1024,16,63

(or whatever your drive geometry). This way you get the drive geometry
specified whenever you boot the system. (And that's assuming lilo works
for you, which it didn't for me.)
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-------------- Shaggy was here! ---------------
Ain't I'm a dawg!!
jjge
2018-08-19 08:43:11 UTC
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On 08/18/2018 08:42 AM, Peter "Shaggy" Haywood wrote:
[...]
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Oh yeah, another thing I forgot to mention. Your problem getting your
hard drive partition recognised might be solved by passing a "hd="
option to your kernel. Insert the (virtual) boot diskette in the
(virtual) floppy drive and boot the (virtual) machine. Before it loads
the kernel it'll prompt for command line args. You need to determine
your drive geometry in CHS (cylinders - heads - sectors per track)
ramdisk hd=1024,16,63
substituting your drive geometry (where 1024 is the number of cylinders,
16 is the number of heads and 63 is the number of sectors per track).
Hit enter/return, and continue the installation as usual.
That one I knew already.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
In the lilo setup,
I do not get so far as lilo, unfortunately.
Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
2018-08-18 06:21:45 UTC
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Groovy hepcat jjge was jivin' in alt.os.linux.slackware on Thu, 16 Aug
2018 3:50 pm. It's a cool scene! Dig it.
Post by jjge
[...]
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
There's no such thing as "Linux 7". Do you mean Slackware 7?
I stand corrected. Yes. I use it occasionally to run the last
available WordPerfect, under a now-defunct libc version.
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Post by jjge
format the HD, and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
Why use that filesystem? You could use umsdos, of course, but I never
saw the point. It should be ext2, IMHO.
Having now tried out this distro on a machine with 2 hard drives but
without any free space for a new partition on either of them, I now see
the point of UMSDOS. :) Yuck, though!
Post by jjge
Well, I tried almost all possibilities, including ext2.
That's odd. I've had no problem using ext2.
Post by jjge
Post by Peter "Shaggy" Haywood
Of course, you should remember that the early version of ext2 in
kernel 1.0.9 doesn't support all the options that ext2 in the 2.6
series (as in Slackware 7) supports; and I don't just mean
journaling. Sou you should look up the mkfs.ext2 man page, especially
the -O (that's a capital o) option. I don't know what options are not
supported by 1.0.9, but you could probably google it, I suppose.
Post by jjge
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs
type, /dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
Elsewhere in this thread you mentioned you were trying to mount it
with msdos instead of umsdos, but even when you changed that it still
didn't work. Sorry! I can't help with that. I've never used umsdos.
Is it possible that the version of mount you're using doesn't support
(u)msdos? No, of course the umsds144.img should do it. It was just a
thought.
Post by jjge
So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very
useful yet. And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone
have an idea to proceed?
The Linux version is 1.0.9
So, the Slackware version would be, according to Wikipedia, 2.0,
right? I'm downloading it now to try it out. I'll try it with qemu
and let you know how it goes in a few days.
I've now tried out Slackware 2.0.0 on a qemu virtual system as well as
on an old 486 (which has several other Linux distros, including a
couple of other versions of Slackware, as well as DOS). I've
encountered several problems in both cases. On both systems I've had
trouble getting the CD-ROM drive recognised. I've worked around this in
qemu, after trying many other things, by setting up the CD-ROM image as
a hard drive and, in the guest OS, mounting the whole disk (not a
partition). But on the 486 Slack 2 still can't get to grips with the
IDE CD drive. Part of the problem may be that it doesn't recognise the
second IDE controller. I'll try temporarily removing the second hard
drive and putting the CD-ROM on the first IDE controller. But I still
doubt that it will work. :(
On the 486, networking worked straight out of the box. The 3com509 ISA
NIC was recognised and functioned fine. Pinging other computers worked
perfectly. I still haven't tried other networking functions (like
accessing NFS shares, transfering files, ssh, etc.), but I'll have a
look at that stuff later.
On the qemu virtual machine, however, networking has so far been a
bust! The few network cards virtualised by this qemu installation don't
seem to be supported by Linux 1.0.9 or 1.1.18. I may have to do what
I've done in the past for various reasons: compile qemu myself,
enabling more network drivers.
As I stated above, I've used UMSDOS to install Slack 2 on the 486. I
could have set up a new partition for it by resizing and shuffling
around some other partitions. But I didn't relish that, actually. I
could've installed a third hard drive; but the ancient kernel seems to
have trouble recognising more than 2 IDE drives, and in fact it
couldn't even see the second hard drive on this machine! Oy! :) Perhaps
all it needs is a couple of "hd=" kernel options. I'll try that later.
I might see if I can find space for a new partition on my 386. For
networking it has a 3com503, which should work. And using ext2 instead
of UMSDOS might not grate so much. There's just something
not-quite-right about UMSDOS.
Compiling the kernel, even the 1.1.18 version, was quick, relatively
painless (except when I enabled certain drivers which wouldn't compile
for some reason) and straight-forward. The compiled kernel works fine.
Installing lilo on the virtual machine failed. I still don't know why.
It just wouldn't boot. I don't like lilo anyhow. I installed grub 0.95
instead. Actually, grub didn't work on Slack 2, possibly because it's
an ELF binary and unsupported by the old kernel. What I had to do was
boot another Linux virtual machine with the Slack 2 disk image as
second drive, and use that to install grub. That worked, and now the
system is bootable.
On the 486 I didn't want to screw up the existing boot loader (also
grub 0.95), so opted not to install lilo at all. I
updated /boot/grub/menu.lst to include an entry for the new system, and
bing - bang - boom, it worked perfectly!
Anyhow, these have been my experiences so far with Slackware 2.0.0.
More experimentation is to come.

Anyhow, as to your original problem, that of not finding the fdisk
binary; on both systems on which I've tried Slackware 2.0.0 the install
disks both had fdisk. No problem there!
But with UMSDOS do you really need to use fdisk? Since you're
installing into a DOS directory on an existing partition, you don't
really need to create a new partition, do you? Or do you for some
reason?
--
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Ain't I'm a dawg!!
Robert
2018-08-26 23:55:40 UTC
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Post by jjge
Hello,
after reading the recent discussions I decided to try the first version of
Slackware, from the InfoMagic CD-ROM set of October 1994.
I made a file for the boot disk (bare-boot144.img), and I tried two different
root disks (color144.img and umsds144.img).
The extension "img" has been added for VBox to find the images.
On starting, I found that the HD controller had too many heads for the
(simulated) BIOS, but the CD-ROM also had a file EIDE.TXT detailing how to go
ahead: ramdisk hd=520,16,63
/bin does not have some essential files, including fdisk, which I would need
to format the HD.
Several other files are also missing, e.g. more.
mount is a link to /etc/mount, and if I enter mount, I get a display of the
images mountd ( / and /dev/fd0 ).
Because I had no fdisk, I mounted the hda device on another Linux vertual
machine (Linux 7, also a fairly ancient version). Here I could format the HD,
and I made an MSDOS files system and a swap file.
However, mount /dev/hda1 /mnt is refused with the message "wrong fs type,
/dev/hda1 already mounted, /mnt busy or other error."
So, the thing seems to work at least basically, but is not very useful yet.
And at this stage, it seems that I am stuck. Does anyone have an idea to
proceed?
The Linux version is 1.0.9
There's some useful stuff here on Niels Horn's site, various old versions
of Slackware are installed using qemu.

http://www.nielshorn.net/slackware/slack_old.php

regards,
--
Robert
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