Discussion:
Gettin' antsy
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Dan C
2018-02-15 00:09:17 UTC
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Hi Slackers,

I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)... I've
got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am waiting for
the next release so I only have to do it once. Any clues as to when it's
coming? Any wild guesses?

Please don't bother with the "when it's ready" bullshit, either. I
already know that. :)
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as the dirigible popped.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
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Grant Taylor
2018-02-15 02:00:53 UTC
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Post by Dan C
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am waiting
for the next release so I only have to do it once.
Why not copy your existing install from your old drive to the SSD?
--
Grant. . . .
unix || die
Dan C
2018-02-15 03:46:12 UTC
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Post by Grant Taylor
Post by Dan C
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am
waiting for the next release so I only have to do it once.
Why not copy your existing install from your old drive to the SSD?
Well... for one thing I'm not completely sure how to do that, and my guess
is that it wouldn't work properly. The new drive is larger, and it's a
multi-boot setup with 4 OS's involved. Not worth the effort to me, I'd
rather just start a new drive with a fresh install, and change up the
partitioning some also.

I like to reinstall from scratch with each new release. Not sure exactly
why, but that's now I've always done things.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he scrambled his partition table.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Grant Taylor
2018-02-15 05:14:15 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Well... for one thing I'm not completely sure how to do that, and my
guess is that it wouldn't work properly.
Why wouldn't it work?
Post by Dan C
The new drive is larger, and it's a multi-boot setup with 4 OS's involved.
Size change (bigger or smaller) shouldn't make any difference. (Well,
as long as there is sufficient space on the new drive.) The same method
of copying works either way.

More than one OS will make it more of a challenge (in that you have to
follow comparable processes for each of them) but should not make it
impossible.

I'm happy to share what I know if you (or anyone else) want to know.
Post by Dan C
Not worth the effort to me, I'd rather just start a new drive with a
fresh install, and change up the partitioning some also.
Okay. Declared personal preference. That works for me.
Post by Dan C
I like to reinstall from scratch with each new release. Not sure exactly
why, but that's now I've always done things.
Fair enough. I typically preferred to do clean installs of Windows when
crossing OS versions. (Read: Anything more than a Service Pack.)
--
Grant. . . .
unix || die
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-02-15 07:09:24 UTC
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Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
Looking at the history of release dates:

2016-07-01
2013-11-07
2012-09-28
2011-04-28
2010-05-24
2009-08-28
2008-12-11
2008-05-02
2007-07-02
2006-10-02
2005-09-14
2005-02-07
2004-06-23
2003-09-26
2003-03-18
2002-06-18
2001-07-01
2000-06-22
1999-10-25
1999-05-17
1999-05-10
1998-10-28
1998-06-09
1997-10-14
1997-07-11
1997-04-20
1996-07-24
1995-08-24
1995-05-24
1995-03-30
1994-09-24

I would say that the trend is longer time between releases. Back in the
1990ies there used to be about two releases every year. Year 2000-2013 it
was about 1 release every year. It was almost 3 years between 14.1 and
14.2 which was released 2016-07-01 so I wouldn't be surprised if it took
more than 3 years for 15.0. If so, that would mean that 15.0 gets
released some time late 2019.

We have not yet seen anything about release candidate in the changelogs.
For 14.2 the first release candidate was 2016-03-17. The second release
candidate was 2017-04-15 about 1 month later. But the final release was
not until 2016-07-01 (according to distrowatch) or 2016-06-30 (according
to the changelog). That release date was more than 3 months after the
first release candidate.

We have also not yet seen any "fun and games" question about 15.0 :-)

So if I were you and wanted to use my brand new SSD I would not hold my
breath for the next release.

regards Henrik
--
The address in the header is only to prevent spam. My real address is:
hc351(at)poolhem.se Examples of addresses which go to spammers:
***@localhost ***@localhost
wobbles
2018-02-15 11:05:21 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
2016-07-01
2013-11-07
2012-09-28
2011-04-28
2010-05-24
2009-08-28
2008-12-11
2008-05-02
2007-07-02
2006-10-02
2005-09-14
2005-02-07
2004-06-23
2003-09-26
2003-03-18
2002-06-18
2001-07-01
2000-06-22
1999-10-25
1999-05-17
1999-05-10
1998-10-28
1998-06-09
1997-10-14
1997-07-11
1997-04-20
1996-07-24
1995-08-24
1995-05-24
1995-03-30
1994-09-24
I would say that the trend is longer time between releases. Back in the
1990ies there used to be about two releases every year. Year 2000-2013 it
was about 1 release every year. It was almost 3 years between 14.1 and
14.2 which was released 2016-07-01 so I wouldn't be surprised if it took
more than 3 years for 15.0. If so, that would mean that 15.0 gets
released some time late 2019.
We have not yet seen anything about release candidate in the changelogs.
For 14.2 the first release candidate was 2016-03-17. The second release
candidate was 2017-04-15 about 1 month later. But the final release was
not until 2016-07-01 (according to distrowatch) or 2016-06-30 (according
to the changelog). That release date was more than 3 months after the
first release candidate.
We have also not yet seen any "fun and games" question about 15.0 :-)
So if I were you and wanted to use my brand new SSD I would not hold my
breath for the next release.
regards Henrik
And expanding those dates to the periods in rotations of our planet between
releases we find the following which tells us - what?

01/07/2016 967
07/11/2013 405
28/09/2012 519
28/04/2011 339
24/05/2010 269
28/08/2009 260
11/12/2008 223
02/05/2008 305
02/07/2007 273
02/10/2006 383
14/09/2005 219
07/02/2005 229
23/06/2004 271
26/09/2003 192
18/03/2003 273
18/06/2002 352
01/07/2001 374
22/06/2000 241
25/10/1999 161
17/05/1999 7
10/05/1999 194
28/10/1998 141
09/06/1998 238
14/10/1997 95
11/07/1997 82
20/04/1997 270
24/07/1996 335
24/08/1995 92
24/05/1995 55
30/03/1995 187
24/09/1994
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-02-16 06:57:12 UTC
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Post by wobbles
And expanding those dates to the periods in rotations of our planet
between releases we find the following which tells us - what?
01/07/2016 967
07/11/2013 405
28/09/2012 519
28/04/2011 339
24/05/2010 269
28/08/2009 260
11/12/2008 223
02/05/2008 305
02/07/2007 273
02/10/2006 383
14/09/2005 219
07/02/2005 229
23/06/2004 271
26/09/2003 192
18/03/2003 273
18/06/2002 352
01/07/2001 374
22/06/2000 241
25/10/1999 161
17/05/1999 7
10/05/1999 194
28/10/1998 141
09/06/1998 238
14/10/1997 95
11/07/1997 82
20/04/1997 270
24/07/1996 335
24/08/1995 92
24/05/1995 55
30/03/1995 187
24/09/1994
01/07/2016 967 A little more than 2.5 years
-------------------
07/11/2013 405
28/09/2012 519
28/04/2011 339
24/05/2010 269
28/08/2009 260
11/12/2008 223
02/05/2008 305
02/07/2007 273
02/10/2006 383
14/09/2005 219
07/02/2005 229
23/06/2004 271
26/09/2003 192
18/03/2003 273
18/06/2002 352
01/07/2001 374
22/06/2000 241 An average of 301 days, almost a year
-------------------
25/10/1999 161
17/05/1999 7
10/05/1999 194
28/10/1998 141
09/06/1998 238
14/10/1997 95
11/07/1997 82
20/04/1997 270
24/07/1996 335
24/08/1995 92
24/05/1995 55
30/03/1995 187 An average of 154 days, less than half a year
-------------------
24/09/1994

So I would say it is a clear trend against longer times between release
dates.

regards Henrik
--
The address in the header is only to prevent spam. My real address is:
hc351(at)poolhem.se Examples of addresses which go to spammers:
***@localhost ***@localhost
Dan C
2018-02-15 13:37:39 UTC
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Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
2016-07-01 2013-11-07 2012-09-28 2011-04-28 2010-05-24 2009-08-28
2008-12-11 2008-05-02 2007-07-02 2006-10-02 2005-09-14 2005-02-07
2004-06-23 2003-09-26 2003-03-18 2002-06-18 2001-07-01 2000-06-22
1999-10-25 1999-05-17 1999-05-10 1998-10-28 1998-06-09 1997-10-14
1997-07-11 1997-04-20 1996-07-24 1995-08-24 1995-05-24 1995-03-30
1994-09-24
I would say that the trend is longer time between releases. Back in the
1990ies there used to be about two releases every year. Year 2000-2013
it was about 1 release every year. It was almost 3 years between 14.1
and 14.2 which was released 2016-07-01 so I wouldn't be surprised if it
took more than 3 years for 15.0. If so, that would mean that 15.0 gets
released some time late 2019.
We have not yet seen anything about release candidate in the changelogs.
For 14.2 the first release candidate was 2016-03-17. The second release
candidate was 2017-04-15 about 1 month later. But the final release was
not until 2016-07-01 (according to distrowatch) or 2016-06-30 (according
to the changelog). That release date was more than 3 months after the
first release candidate.
We have also not yet seen any "fun and games" question about 15.0 :-)
So if I were you and wanted to use my brand new SSD I would not hold my
breath for the next release.
regards Henrik
Good analysis... Not exactly what I was hoping to hear, but probably
accurate.

Thanks Henrik.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as the antimatter containment vessel ruptured.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Red
2018-02-16 17:32:09 UTC
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On Thu, 15 Feb 2018 07:09:24 -0000 (UTC), Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
I would say that the trend is longer time between releases. Back in the
1990ies there used to be about two releases every year. Year 2000-2013 it
was about 1 release every year. It was almost 3 years between 14.1 and
14.2 which was released 2016-07-01 so I wouldn't be surprised if it took
more than 3 years for 15.0. If so, that would mean that 15.0 gets
released some time late 2019.
The time between 14.1 and 14.2 must've had some kind of unwanted delay
that we weren't told about due to Slackware's secrecy. For several
months before 14.2's release, the latest versions of popular programs
and libraries could not be compiled because of reliance on later
versions of libraries and C++11, most notably FileZilla which would
repeatedly attempt to update itself and fail. There had to have been
an original plan to release 14.2 around winter 2016 at least, which
was delayed for some unknown reason which was not mentioned in the
changelogs.
John McCue
2018-02-17 00:00:03 UTC
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Red <***@usenet.invalid> wrote:
<snip>
Post by Red
The time between 14.1 and 14.2 must've had some kind of
unwanted delay...
<snip>

If I had to guess, it was due to the move from
udev to eudev.

John
Doug713705
2018-02-17 12:11:21 UTC
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Le 16-02-2018, Red nous expliquait dans
Post by Red
an original plan to release 14.2 around winter 2016 at least, which
was delayed for some unknown reason which was not mentioned in the
changelogs.
A conspiracy fomented by systemd fanboys, no doubt :D
--
Je ne connaîtrai rien de tes habitudes
Il se peut même que tu sois décédée
Mais j'demanderai ta main pour la couper
-- H.F. Thiéfaine, L'ascenceur de 22H43
Red
2018-02-17 17:42:18 UTC
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2018 12:11:21 +0000 (UTC), Doug713705
Post by Doug713705
Le 16-02-2018, Red nous expliquait dans
Post by Red
an original plan to release 14.2 around winter 2016 at least, which
was delayed for some unknown reason which was not mentioned in the
changelogs.
A conspiracy fomented by systemd fanboys, no doubt :D
NEVER, EVER claim that I support systemd.
Joe Rosevear
2018-07-02 14:39:21 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
2016-07-01
2013-11-07
2012-09-28
2011-04-28
2010-05-24
2009-08-28
2008-12-11
2008-05-02
2007-07-02
2006-10-02
2005-09-14
2005-02-07
2004-06-23
2003-09-26
2003-03-18
2002-06-18
2001-07-01
2000-06-22
1999-10-25
1999-05-17
1999-05-10
1998-10-28
1998-06-09
1997-10-14
1997-07-11
1997-04-20
1996-07-24
1995-08-24
1995-05-24
1995-03-30
1994-09-24
I would say that the trend is longer time between releases. Back in the
1990ies there used to be about two releases every year. Year 2000-2013 it
was about 1 release every year. It was almost 3 years between 14.1 and
14.2 which was released 2016-07-01 so I wouldn't be surprised if it took
more than 3 years for 15.0. If so, that would mean that 15.0 gets
released some time late 2019.
We have not yet seen anything about release candidate in the changelogs.
For 14.2 the first release candidate was 2016-03-17. The second release
candidate was 2017-04-15 about 1 month later. But the final release was
not until 2016-07-01 (according to distrowatch) or 2016-06-30 (according
to the changelog). That release date was more than 3 months after the
first release candidate.
We have also not yet seen any "fun and games" question about 15.0 :-)
So if I were you and wanted to use my brand new SSD I would not hold my
breath for the next release.
regards Henrik
Hello,

I was inspired to graph your data.

Go to

http://joeslife.org/projects/slack_stuff/graph/releases-r.pdf

to see what I did using gnuplot.

Most interesting.

-Joe
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-07-02 18:23:24 UTC
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Post by Joe Rosevear
I was inspired to graph your data.
Go to
http://joeslife.org/projects/slack_stuff/graph/releases-r.pdf
to see what I did using gnuplot.
Nice plot! There seems to be a knee on the curve somewhere around year
2000 and another knee somewhere around year 2012.

regards Henrik
Eef Hartman
2018-02-15 09:08:52 UTC
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Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
With again a newer kernel (4.14.19, the 9th update this year) and pkg
tools in -current, I wouldn't expect it in less then 6 months and I
wouldn't at all be surprised if it didn't come till summer 2019.
The -current tree isn't at all stable yet and with the problems with
kernel and firmware it won't be for some time yet or maye even until
Intel brings out a new cpu out with no known problems with Meltdown
and Spectre.

There are a few signs that Pat will be changing the package format
(from .txz to .tlz), which means everyting will have to be repacked.
Dan C
2018-02-15 13:38:34 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
With again a newer kernel (4.14.19, the 9th update this year) and pkg
tools in -current, I wouldn't expect it in less then 6 months and I
wouldn't at all be surprised if it didn't come till summer 2019.
The -current tree isn't at all stable yet and with the problems with
kernel and firmware it won't be for some time yet or maye even until
Intel brings out a new cpu out with no known problems with Meltdown and
Spectre.
There are a few signs that Pat will be changing the package format (from
.txz to .tlz), which means everyting will have to be repacked.
Thanks for that insight and opinion, Eef. Appreciate it.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he sent another AreaFix message.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
John McCue
2018-02-15 18:11:40 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Any clues as to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
<snip>
Post by Eef Hartman
There are a few signs that Pat will be changing the package format
(from .txz to .tlz), which means everyting will have to be repacked.
I never heard of .tlz until now, so I did a quick google
and seems there are real reasons to swap over.

thanks for the info,
John
Eef Hartman
2018-02-15 18:22:15 UTC
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Post by John McCue
I never heard of .tlz until now, so I did a quick google
and seems there are real reasons to swap over.
Change .tlz to mean .tar.lz. We never really used the previous
definition (which was tar.lzma), and .lz is a probably a better
format than xz or lzma.
Reference: https://www.nongnu.org/lzip/xz_inadequate.html
For xz/lzip based packages, support multithreaded
compression/decompression.
and
Post by John McCue
a/plzip-1.7-i586-1.txz (cq -x86_64-, of course)
plzip is parallel lzip, from the same maker of lzip / lunzip
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-02-16 07:01:29 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
plzip is parallel lzip, from the same maker of lzip / lunzip
With my tool splitjob ( http://splitjob.sourceforge.net/ ) you are able to
parallel compressions like lzip, xz, bzip2 and gzip. Parallelisation can
be done on multiple cores, or together with ssh, even on multiple
machines.

regards Henrik
--
The address in the header is only to prevent spam. My real address is:
hc351(at)poolhem.se Examples of addresses which go to spammers:
***@localhost ***@localhost
Eef Hartman
2018-02-18 19:25:06 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
With my tool splitjob ( http://splitjob.sourceforge.net/ ) you are
able to parallel compressions like lzip, xz, bzip2 and gzip.
But with plzip standard in -current the pkgtools now will do that
automatically for .tlz files.
Eef Hartman
2018-02-20 14:36:39 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
With again a newer kernel (4.14.19, the 9th update this year)
Again another kernel update: 4.14.20
(and one for the pkg tools too, already the 4th build for the 15.0
version of this package).
Rinaldi J. Montessi
2018-02-20 15:26:27 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by Eef Hartman
With again a newer kernel (4.14.19, the 9th update this year)
Again another kernel update: 4.14.20
(and one for the pkg tools too, already the 4th build for the 15.0
version of this package).
Neither of which has hit the rsync repositories I use (Warsaw and HEANET).

I went back to current about a month ago. Lots of re-boots since ;-)

Rinaldi
--
"Grub first, then ethics."
-- Bertolt Brecht
Eef Hartman
2018-02-24 18:37:02 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Again another kernel update: 4.14.20
Surprise: still another kernel update in -current and a newer
firmware package too:
4.14.21 and 20180222_7344ec9
Eef Hartman
2018-03-12 00:35:24 UTC
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Post by Eef Hartman
Post by Eef Hartman
With again a newer kernel (4.14.19, the 9th update this year)
Again another kernel update: 4.14.20
Kernel updates keep on coming fast:
the current one in -current is now 4.14.25 but on kernel.org versions
4.14.26 and 4.15.9 are available.
Even the 4.4.118 - the latest available update for 14.2 - one is
already out-of-date on kernel.org: 4.4.121 is now available there.
Dan C
2018-04-21 23:13:14 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Hi Slackers,
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am
waiting for the next release so I only have to do it once. Any clues as
to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
Please don't bother with the "when it's ready" bullshit, either. I
already know that. :)
Replying to my own (old) post with a new theory...

I was browsing historical version release dates today, and noticed
something interesting: It was on July 17, 1993 that Patrick first
announced (on Usenet) the availability of version 1.0 of this new thing
called Slackware.

It will be 25 years ago this July.

Therefore I boldly predict that version 15.0 will be released on July 17,
2018, to mark the grand occasion of the 25 year anniversary.

You heard it here first. :)
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he backed into a squad car.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Auric__
2018-04-22 03:14:46 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Dan C
Hi Slackers,
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am
waiting for the next release so I only have to do it once. Any clues as
to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
Please don't bother with the "when it's ready" bullshit, either. I
already know that. :)
Replying to my own (old) post with a new theory...
I was browsing historical version release dates today, and noticed
something interesting: It was on July 17, 1993 that Patrick first
announced (on Usenet) the availability of version 1.0 of this new thing
called Slackware.
It will be 25 years ago this July.
Therefore I boldly predict that version 15.0 will be released on July 17,
2018, to mark the grand occasion of the 25 year anniversary.
You heard it here first. :)
It's as good a theory as any I've heard.
--
But I am filled with a terrible energy. A terrible purpose.
Alexander Grotewohl
2018-04-23 22:55:46 UTC
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Post by Auric__
Post by Dan C
Post by Dan C
Hi Slackers,
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am
waiting for the next release so I only have to do it once. Any clues as
to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
Please don't bother with the "when it's ready" bullshit, either. I
already know that. :)
Replying to my own (old) post with a new theory...
I was browsing historical version release dates today, and noticed
something interesting: It was on July 17, 1993 that Patrick first
announced (on Usenet) the availability of version 1.0 of this new thing
called Slackware.
It will be 25 years ago this July.
Therefore I boldly predict that version 15.0 will be released on July 17,
2018, to mark the grand occasion of the 25 year anniversary.
You heard it here first. :)
It's as good a theory as any I've heard.
Maybe this will give me a reason to finally resize my slightly-too-small
root partition. I'll be able to ignore /tmp for a few weeks longer ;)
Michael Black
2018-07-01 15:23:36 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Dan C
Hi Slackers,
I'm starting to wonder if there's ever gonna be a release (15.0)...
I've got a brand new SSD drive that I want to start using, but am
waiting for the next release so I only have to do it once. Any clues as
to when it's coming? Any wild guesses?
Please don't bother with the "when it's ready" bullshit, either. I
already know that. :)
Replying to my own (old) post with a new theory...
I was browsing historical version release dates today, and noticed
something interesting: It was on July 17, 1993 that Patrick first
announced (on Usenet) the availability of version 1.0 of this new thing
called Slackware.
It will be 25 years ago this July.
Therefore I boldly predict that version 15.0 will be released on July 17,
2018, to mark the grand occasion of the 25 year anniversary.
You heard it here first. :)
When I saw this back in April, it made a lot of sense.

There had just been the April 19th "third ever Slackware Mass Rebuild
(and the longest ChangeLog entry in project history)". Rebuilding
everything, getting rid of old artifacts, why do that now? And then your
post, and "of course, there is time to kill so why not attend to some
things that needed clearing out". A few days later there was something
about putting alsa back instead of pulseaudio and it went. So it did seem
like there was a deadline in mind, and time to kill.

But now it's July and 2.5 months later, and sadly, I don't think it's
going to happen. There have been some pretty long periods of beta and
release candidates in recent releases, and July 17th is just two weeks
away. Even if things froze today, I don't think a proper release can
happen on the 17th.

Though maybe on the 17th they will announce a freeze, and only fixes added
in after that. Maybe Slackware 1.0 was in effect a beta, since 1.1 came
out in November, four months later.

But surely something has to come soon. Wikipedia reminds us that 14.2
came out two years ago yesterday.

Michael
Eef Hartman
2018-07-01 17:12:14 UTC
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Post by Michael Black
There had just been the April 19th "third ever Slackware Mass Rebuild
(and the longest ChangeLog entry in project history)". Rebuilding
everything, getting rid of old artifacts, why do that now?
And Pat managed to upgrade 3 more of those old XF86 drivers:
x/xf86-video-r128-20180625_c4c878d-i586-1.txz: Upgraded.
x/xf86-video-savage-20180625_0ece556-i586-1.txz: Upgraded.
x/xf86-video-sis-20170717_a50b2b3-i586-1.txz: Upgraded.

so that leaves geode, s3virge and tseng as possibly obsolete X drivers
that won't build with gcc 8.1.1
Post by Michael Black
Even if things froze today, I don't think a proper release can
happen on the 17th.
No, still too much happing. I think a autumn release will already be
hurrying it.
Post by Michael Black
Maybe Slackware 1.0 was in effect a beta, since 1.1 came out in
November, four months later.
Releases did come out much faster then:
1.1 was already succeeded by 1.1.1 in Dec of that year and - after a few
more "minor release updates" like that - 1.2 came out on March 19, 1994,
4 months later again (and 2.0 was released later that year, in July).
Pat didn't have an update strategy yet, so changes meant a new release.
Lew Pitcher
2018-07-05 17:42:55 UTC
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Michael Black wrote:
[snip]
Post by Michael Black
Though maybe on the 17th they will announce a freeze, and only fixes added
in after that. Maybe Slackware 1.0 was in effect a beta, since 1.1 came
out in November, four months later.
But surely something has to come soon. Wikipedia reminds us that 14.2
came out two years ago yesterday.
Current change log shows new coreutils, kernels, modules, headers, and
installers as of July 3

Seems to me that we're very close to an RC1
--
Lew Pitcher
"In Skills, We Trust"
PGP public key available upon request
Eef Hartman
2018-07-05 19:16:24 UTC
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Post by Lew Pitcher
Current change log shows new coreutils, kernels, modules, headers
Kernel updates are occurring more than weekly, even though 4.14
should a long term _stable_ kernel:
Jul 3: 4.14.53
Jan 3: 4.14.11
so 42 "minor" updates in 6 months (26 weeks) making 3 every 2 weeks.

And kernel 4.16 is now EOL while there's a 4.18 RC3 already out as the
mainline one.

So that's no sign of an rc coming "soon"
Dan C
2018-07-06 01:19:56 UTC
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Post by Lew Pitcher
Current change log shows new coreutils, kernels, modules, headers
Kernel updates are occurring more than weekly, even though 4.14 should a
Jul 3: 4.14.53 Jan 3: 4.14.11 so 42 "minor" updates in 6 months (26
weeks) making 3 every 2 weeks.
And kernel 4.16 is now EOL while there's a 4.18 RC3 already out as the
mainline one.
So that's no sign of an rc coming "soon"
I could be wrong here, as I don't really follow kernel versions/releases
too closely.... but isn't it true that a new Slack release doesn't
necessarily use the latest kernel available?

For example, when 14.2 was released, was 4.4.x the latest possible
kernel? I'm thinking not... Again, I could be wrong, and haven't closely
checked this for validity.

What say you?
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he got cattle-prodded in the groin.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Rich
2018-07-06 03:21:56 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Lew Pitcher
Current change log shows new coreutils, kernels, modules, headers
Kernel updates are occurring more than weekly, even though 4.14 should a
Jul 3: 4.14.53 Jan 3: 4.14.11 so 42 "minor" updates in 6 months (26
weeks) making 3 every 2 weeks.
And kernel 4.16 is now EOL while there's a 4.18 RC3 already out as the
mainline one.
So that's no sign of an rc coming "soon"
I could be wrong here, as I don't really follow kernel versions/releases
too closely.... but isn't it true that a new Slack release doesn't
necessarily use the latest kernel available?
For example, when 14.2 was released, was 4.4.x the latest possible
kernel? I'm thinking not... Again, I could be wrong, and haven't closely
checked this for validity.
What say you?
I suspect that given all the Spectre and Spectre variant mitigations in
recent kernels, that -current is seeing more updates to keep up with
those mitigations. Resulting in it tracking more closely the "newest"
kernel than is usual for Slackware.
Michael Black
2018-07-06 04:41:05 UTC
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Post by Dan C
Post by Lew Pitcher
Current change log shows new coreutils, kernels, modules, headers
Kernel updates are occurring more than weekly, even though 4.14 should a
Jul 3: 4.14.53 Jan 3: 4.14.11 so 42 "minor" updates in 6 months (26
weeks) making 3 every 2 weeks.
And kernel 4.16 is now EOL while there's a 4.18 RC3 already out as the
mainline one.
So that's no sign of an rc coming "soon"
I could be wrong here, as I don't really follow kernel versions/releases
too closely.... but isn't it true that a new Slack release doesn't
necessarily use the latest kernel available?
For example, when 14.2 was released, was 4.4.x the latest possible
kernel? I'm thinking not... Again, I could be wrong, and haven't closely
checked this for validity.
What say you?
I have followed the changelog for some years, in the bginning curiosity
about when the next release might come, but it's intersting in itself.

Certainly the kernel gets upgraded a lot, maybe everytime thereis a new
one, But yes, sometimes a bit later there's a reversion and a note about
"it conflicts with this or that". For that matter, that does happen with
other software. As someone pointed out, aaa_base gets kicked up to the
next release number and that's an indicator of the next release, but it
always seems like slackware is waiting for something, and what isn't
clear. You might as well bump up to the next version of something while
waiting, but sometimes there are problems and it's easier to revert than
fix the problem at the time.

It's like a live Grateful Dead show, they go off on tangents and then at
some point they come back to the main song, all lined up properly.

Michael
jrg
2018-07-06 19:03:57 UTC
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Post by Michael Black
all lined up properly.
most of the time...

Henrik Carlqvist
2018-07-06 06:03:11 UTC
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Post by Dan C
I could be wrong here, as I don't really follow kernel versions/releases
too closely.... but isn't it true that a new Slack release doesn't
necessarily use the latest kernel available?
For example, when 14.2 was released, was 4.4.x the latest possible
kernel? I'm thinking not...
At the time of this writing, the latest stable kernel is 4.17.4. But
Slackware does not choose latest stable, instead Slackware goes for the
latest longterm which is 4.14 in Slackware current.

By selecting a longterm kernel Slackware 14.2 still has access to updated
kernels in the 4.4 series even though later stable kernels like 4.5 and
4.16 has been declared end of life.

regards Henrik
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