Discussion:
Hello Slackware Users!
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Jimmy Johnson
2018-06-29 03:33:28 UTC
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I did my homework for a week and then started installing, it's been a
learning thing.

I now have 3 computers with 14.2 installed, they are all the same and I
still have four more computers to go.
Loading Image... In the next photo the screen on the
right is actually larger and is where I watch movies or play kpat.
Loading Image...

I've been downloading packages from slackware packages and installing
from repos too and removing packages. I wrote a script named rc.firewall
to get ufw to start and I had to download ufw too. I could not get
wicd-kde to work so removed it and installed wicd-gtk, other things I
have installed are the kwin-crystal-theme, dmz-cursor, yawp weather,
numlockx, python and smplayer.

I don't know if I can have more than one repo to get access to other
packages so I don't have to search google and download. But at the same
time I can't think of anything else I need.

I don't use pim applications and would like to remove them. In debian I
had to deal with meta packages removing things I wanted to keep and I'm
wondering if I will have to deal with problems if I remove packages like
kmail, korg, contact, etc. So far I have removed some multimedia stuff
with no problems. Any advice on removing packages or keeping downloaded
packages that I have installed is welcome because 'slackpkg
clean-system' is a bit scary and is what broke my first install.

Thanks,
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware 14.2-64 - KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-06-29 07:58:50 UTC
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Post by Jimmy Johnson
I don't use pim applications and would like to remove them. In debian I
had to deal with meta packages removing things I wanted to keep and I'm
wondering if I will have to deal with problems if I remove packages like
kmail, korg, contact, etc. So far I have removed some multimedia stuff
with no problems. Any advice on removing packages or keeping downloaded
packages that I have installed is welcome
One of the distinguishing strenghts, but also a weakness of Slackware
package management is that it doesn't keep track of dependencies between
packages.

This means that you can easily install or remove single packages without
having to worry about the package manager starting to download and/or
upgrade a lot of other more or less related packages. But it also means
that you might end up with a system having broken applications in lack of
needed but uninstalled packages.

The standard way to do a Slackware installation is to do a full install.
It might leave you with a system were you only use a small fraction of
the installed software, but at least you know that all installed software
works.

Third party packages like the ones from Slackbuilds.org might have
dependencies and there are tools which will handle those dependencies
like slpkg.

Everyone is a beginner when they start. Many years ago when I installed
Slackware for the first time I carefully selected the packages I wanted
for my install. Among the packages there were some strange groff document
formatting program that I did not see any use for. That installation
ended up without any useful man pages, so I learned the hard way that
full install is the way to go. Hard disk storage is cheap, your time is
precious.

regards Henrik
Jimmy Johnson
2018-06-29 13:36:38 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Jimmy Johnson
I don't use pim applications and would like to remove them. In debian I
had to deal with meta packages removing things I wanted to keep and I'm
wondering if I will have to deal with problems if I remove packages like
kmail, korg, contact, etc. So far I have removed some multimedia stuff
with no problems. Any advice on removing packages or keeping downloaded
packages that I have installed is welcome
One of the distinguishing strenghts, but also a weakness of Slackware
package management is that it doesn't keep track of dependencies between
packages.
This means that you can easily install or remove single packages without
having to worry about the package manager starting to download and/or
upgrade a lot of other more or less related packages. But it also means
that you might end up with a system having broken applications in lack of
needed but uninstalled packages.
I understand, in debian that is called manual install, best practice is
to remove the application in debian, change auto install packages to
manual installed and let deborphan clean it up.

Which brings me to the question how do I clean a slackware system?
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
The standard way to do a Slackware installation is to do a full install.
It might leave you with a system were you only use a small fraction of
the installed software, but at least you know that all installed software
works.
Yes, I'm doing full installs and removing what I will not be using. And
I promise I will know what the app does before I remove it. :)
Like the amazon movie downloader is something I will never use and I
never use any of the pim apps, I just don't need them.

The calendar was a nice add, I need to find out how to back it up and or
copy to other computers?
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Third party packages like the ones from Slackbuilds.org might have
dependencies and there are tools which will handle those dependencies
like slpkg.
I had to install python and it was a simple slackpkg install, that's all
so far. Also I've used upgradepkg --install-new for my downloads. I
never did get wicd-kde to work I don't have a clue what was wrong with
it, but the demon would not start.
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Everyone is a beginner when they start. Many years ago when I installed
Slackware for the first time I carefully selected the packages I wanted
for my install. Among the packages there were some strange groff document
formatting program that I did not see any use for. That installation
ended up without any useful man pages, so I learned the hard way that
full install is the way to go. Hard disk storage is cheap, your time is
precious.
I started installing systems in '94 first suse that I bought from a
store in Santa Clara County, CA. where I went to school and worked, then
started downloading everything linux, I like puppy linux and used it in
my field laptop for testing networks, it was a old Tecra with 32Megs of
RAM and on the desktop I used debian Libranet GNU/Linux until it's
founder died in 2006 and switched to Debian Mepis GNU/Linux until it's
founder abandoned the distro about four yrs ago, it's now called MX
linux and antiX linux made by the the old Mepis forum members, they like
all the new stuff and I like old and stable so I switched to pure Debian
then, until now because they adopted systemd and all my testing tells me
systemd is not a good thing for a user to be using. Also I think debian
Devuan is good project, their Devuan Jessie is very stable, but will
only be alive for two more yrs before it's replaced, currently it's now
old-stable since May 2018. So now I'm adopting Patrick's Slackware and
doing my best to stay away from get-hub and all of it's Neo-Linux
developers.
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
regards Henrik
Thanks,
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware 14.2-64 - KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-07-01 19:42:44 UTC
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Post by Jimmy Johnson
Which brings me to the question how do I clean a slackware system?
If you by clean mean to remove packages the tool to use is removpkg.

Most other cleaning and hosekeeping is done by itself, but a Slackware
computer works best if it is running 24/7, then cron jobs will do stuff
like rotate logs.

regards Henrik

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