Discussion:
live iso
Add Reply
jrg
2018-05-29 23:29:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I was looking for a distro w/o systemd and with enlightenment so I went
to look at gentoo, Apparently, enlightenment is not possible w/o
systemd. Turns out gentoo was not possible either (nightmare build,
absurd documentation, and multiple conflicts (collisions)) so I'm going
with slackware. I'd like to use the live iso to save myself time - I've
not compiled much more than a few kernels here and there in linux - so I
d/l the Slackware Live Edition. It calls for a slack64-live iso but all
the mirrors.slackware sites show seem to be slackware64-14.2-install isos.

Is the 'live' and 'install' a meaningful difference?

Tnx
jg
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-05-30 05:29:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jrg
I'd like to use the live iso to save myself time - I've
not compiled much more than a few kernels here and there in linux - so I
d/l the Slackware Live Edition. It calls for a slack64-live iso but all
the mirrors.slackware sites show seem to be slackware64-14.2-install isos.
You might want to look at a place
like http://bear.alienbase.nl/mirrors/slackware-live/1.1.9.7/ for
live .isos unless you want to build your iso file yourself.
Post by jrg
Is the 'live' and 'install' a meaningful difference?
The install iso is for installing Slackware onto your HD, it will give
you a text interface to do so and at the root prompt you will also be
able to do some maintanance like mounting file systems and editing files
with vi.

I have not used any Slackware live iso myself, but a live iso usually
gives a more full featured environment with graphical login and an
ordinari user account (not only root). Running a live iso system is
usually a lot slower than booting a Linux system from HD.

regards Henrik
root
2018-05-30 14:21:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
I have not used any Slackware live iso myself, but a live iso usually
gives a more full featured environment with graphical login and an
ordinari user account (not only root). Running a live iso system is
usually a lot slower than booting a Linux system from HD.
LiveSlak (USB) is not like live distributions that come on DVD/CD.
Changes and additions made to LiveSlak remain and are available
the next time you boot. When LiveSlak is installed on a USB-3
flash the performance is very comparable to a standard install.

Carry a LiveSlak with you at all times-impress your friends.
jrg
2018-05-30 16:49:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by root
LiveSlak (USB) is not like live distributions that come on DVD/CD.
Changes and additions made to LiveSlak remain and are available
the next time you boot.
The script tarball I took down does this with a switch, implication
being no switch, no persistence. Went back and reread the README and I
was wrong - switches are for choices of file or no and a custom name for
saif file.

Thanks.
jrg
2018-05-30 17:15:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by jrg
saif file
s/b said file
Joe Rosevear
2018-06-05 05:58:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by root
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
I have not used any Slackware live iso myself, but a live iso usually
gives a more full featured environment with graphical login and an
ordinari user account (not only root). Running a live iso system is
usually a lot slower than booting a Linux system from HD.
LiveSlak (USB) is not like live distributions that come on DVD/CD.
Changes and additions made to LiveSlak remain and are available
the next time you boot. When LiveSlak is installed on a USB-3
flash the performance is very comparable to a standard install.
Carry a LiveSlak with you at all times-impress your friends.
Well, my hats off to Alien Bob and his LiveSlak, but I'm wondering
about the use of the word "live".

Perhaps it is a special distribution because of how it is configured.
I can appreciate that. In fact, I've done it myself. I have a
pre-configured Slackware installation on USB-3 flash drive. But I
don't call it "live". The term seems to add no information to what we
already know. It is Slackware. It runs on a drive which happens to be
an external flash drive. Slackware doesn't care what sort of drive it
runs on, and neither does it care whether the drive is internal or
external. There are a few minor differences in how the system needs to
be configured. That is all.

By the way, my system is called SuperDrive. (Not yet available from
SourceForge.) You can run it from the flash drive, or you can run a
script that is on the flash drive which walks you through an rsync
based install to another drive. Normally one would install it to an
internal hard drive.

I *am* excited, as you and Alien Bob seem to be, about this new way of
running Slackware. It changes things. Can you say "paradigm shift"?

By the way, my plan is to upload not a whole Slackware system to
SourceForge, but just the changes, in kit form, that one needs to apply
to an existing Slackware installation.

-Joe
notbob
2018-06-05 20:39:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Rosevear
SourceForge, but just the changes, in kit form, that one needs to apply
to an existing Slackware installation.
What if "one" doesn't have an "existing Slackware installation"?

nb
Joe Rosevear
2018-06-06 03:28:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by notbob
Post by Joe Rosevear
SourceForge, but just the changes, in kit form, that one needs to apply
to an existing Slackware installation.
What if "one" doesn't have an "existing Slackware installation"?
nb
Sounds like what you want is a finished and ready to use system. I
don't think my kit would be of much use to you. I would recommend that
you download, install and configure Slackware or find someone to do it
for you.

You can understand perhaps why I didn't start with that. I need a way
to produce my product. That is why I'm starting with a kit. I am my
first customer. I used the kit to produce a working
SuperDrive/Slackware-14.2, and I'll use it again when Slackware 15.0 is
released.

This dog can do more than one trick, however. Once you have a
SuperDrive/Slackware system you can use it in that form and/or run a
script that it contains to clone the system to a new drive (flash drive
or hard drive). Someone could do that to make a flash drive, then
give/sell it to you. So that is one way you could get an almost
finished system. I say "almost", because some configuring is still
needed.

By the way, I have used the above script to install my system to more
than two dozen computers at the school where I work. That was my
motivation for producing SuperDrive.

I have made no effort to reduce the size of the system. It is a full
16 bit Slackware system requiring about 9 GB of storage when installed.
I suppose I could break it into pieces and upload compressed tarballs
to SourceForge. And I suppose I could write a script to walk you
through the process of preparing the target partitions and installing
the tarballs.

I could do these things, but its hard to say how soon if at all. I'm
well occupied right now with developing, testing, documenting, and
releasing the kit.

-Joe
Alexander Grotewohl
2018-06-06 15:08:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Rosevear
Perhaps it is a special distribution because of how it is configured.
I can appreciate that. In fact, I've done it myself. I have a
pre-configured Slackware installation on USB-3 flash drive. But I
don't call it "live". The term seems to add no information to what we
already know. It is Slackware. It runs on a drive which happens to be
an external flash drive. Slackware doesn't care what sort of drive it
runs on, and neither does it care whether the drive is internal or
external. There are a few minor differences in how the system needs to
be configured. That is all.
The Live in the name has always meant "pre-installed, ready to go." Just
because you don't care for the term doesn't change it's well established
meaning ;)
Joe Rosevear
2018-06-07 06:30:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alexander Grotewohl
Post by Joe Rosevear
Perhaps it is a special distribution because of how it is configured.
I can appreciate that. In fact, I've done it myself. I have a
pre-configured Slackware installation on USB-3 flash drive. But I
don't call it "live". The term seems to add no information to what we
already know. It is Slackware. It runs on a drive which happens to be
an external flash drive. Slackware doesn't care what sort of drive it
runs on, and neither does it care whether the drive is internal or
external. There are a few minor differences in how the system needs to
be configured. That is all.
The Live in the name has always meant "pre-installed, ready to go." Just
because you don't care for the term doesn't change it's well established
meaning ;)
Thanks, I didn't understand. Even when I read your simple reply I
didn't get it. I was going to write a long reply. Then I figured it
out. I was there all along--I just didn't know what "live" meant.

It's like a TV dinner or instant rice. A live distribution saves you
time, because it is pre-configured. You install it, and bang, it's
ready to go. Or, in the case of live CDs, it needs no installing. How
about live SD cards?

-Joe
root
2018-06-07 14:53:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Rosevear
It's like a TV dinner or instant rice. A live distribution saves you
time, because it is pre-configured. You install it, and bang, it's
ready to go. Or, in the case of live CDs, it needs no installing. How
about live SD cards?
-Joe
A live distribution is one that *does not* have to be installed: It
runs directly from the provided medium.

Slackware has always been ready to go once it has been installed,
but it cannot be (fully) run from the install disk.
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-06-08 05:36:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
A live distribution is one that *does not* have to be installed: It runs
directly from the provided medium.
Yes, and when it comes to CD and DVD the tricky part is that those are
read only media. As a live CD is not supposed to change anything on your
internal drive when run this means that it has to use tricks like ram
disks and/or fusion file systems to be able to run.

regards Henrik
Joe Rosevear
2018-06-09 04:05:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by root
Post by Joe Rosevear
It's like a TV dinner or instant rice. A live distribution saves you
time, because it is pre-configured. You install it, and bang, it's
ready to go. Or, in the case of live CDs, it needs no installing. How
about live SD cards?
-Joe
A live distribution is one that *does not* have to be installed: It
runs directly from the provided medium.
Slackware has always been ready to go once it has been installed,
but it cannot be (fully) run from the install disk.
Yes, I know. But it does need to be burned, or whatever you want to
call it, to the media. Which is what I meant :)

-Joe
Bit Twister
2018-06-09 11:38:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Rosevear
Post by root
Post by Joe Rosevear
It's like a TV dinner or instant rice. A live distribution saves you
time, because it is pre-configured. You install it, and bang, it's
ready to go. Or, in the case of live CDs, it needs no installing. How
about live SD cards?
-Joe
A live distribution is one that *does not* have to be installed: It
runs directly from the provided medium.
snip
Post by Joe Rosevear
Yes, I know. But it does need to be burned, or whatever you want to
call it, to the media. Which is what I meant :)
In the majority of the cases the answer is yes.
For the other cases you have to have some application that can boot an
iso file from disk.

For example, I am running grub2 as my system boot loader.
I dropped a script into /etc/grub.d/ which creates menu entries to
boot the iso of possible interest/usage.
Joe Rosevear
2018-06-10 02:35:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bit Twister
In the majority of the cases the answer is yes.
For the other cases you have to have some application that can boot an
iso file from disk.
For example, I am running grub2 as my system boot loader.
I dropped a script into /etc/grub.d/ which creates menu entries to
boot the iso of possible interest/usage.
This is how I do the above. I used a text editor to make a grug.cfg
file as shown below:

default='0'
timeout='3'

menuentry 'Slackware 14.2 Installation '{
root='hd1,msdos9'
isofile='/Slackware/slackware-14.2-iso/slackware-14.2-install-d1.iso'
loopback loop $isofile
echo 'Loading Linux kernel ...'
linux (loop)/kernels/hugesmp.s/bzImage
echo 'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
echo 'Starting Slackware Linux ...'
initrd (loop)/isolinux/initrd.img
}

I thought you would like to see this, because I think it does the same
as what you described, but more directly and without the use of
/etc/grub.d.

I like it mainly because it lets me install Slackware directly from the
downloaded iso files--no need to burn CDs.

-Joe
Bit Twister
2018-06-10 11:38:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Rosevear
Post by Bit Twister
In the majority of the cases the answer is yes.
For the other cases you have to have some application that can boot an
iso file from disk.
For example, I am running grub2 as my system boot loader.
I dropped a script into /etc/grub.d/ which creates menu entries to
boot the iso of possible interest/usage.
This is how I do the above. I used a text editor to make a grug.cfg
default='0'
timeout='3'
menuentry 'Slackware 14.2 Installation '{
root='hd1,msdos9'
isofile='/Slackware/slackware-14.2-iso/slackware-14.2-install-d1.iso'
loopback loop $isofile
echo 'Loading Linux kernel ...'
linux (loop)/kernels/hugesmp.s/bzImage
echo 'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
echo 'Starting Slackware Linux ...'
initrd (loop)/isolinux/initrd.img
}
I thought you would like to see this, because I think it does the same
as what you described, but more directly and without the use of
/etc/grub.d.
For any lurkers, be aware that the next execution of update-grub will
wipe any custom changes you make to grug.cfg
Post by Joe Rosevear
I like it mainly because it lets me install Slackware directly from the
downloaded iso files--no need to burn CDs.
But you have remember to edt grub.cfg for the new iso. :(
With a script you can have boot selections like

$ grep menuentry /boot/grub2/grub.cfg | grep iso
menuentry 'Mageia-4.1-x86_64-DVD.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-5.1-x86_64-DVD.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-6-LiveDVD-Xfce-x86_64-DVD.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-6-netinstall-nonfree-x86_64.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-6-netinstall-x86_64.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-6-x86_64-DVD.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-Cauldron-netinstall-nonfree-x86_64.iso' {
menuentry 'Mageia-Cauldron-netinstall-x86_64.iso' {
menuentry 'System Rescue ISO (64-bit) ' {

All I do is add/remove iso files, run update-grub and have an up to
date grub.cfg.

For anyone interested. and keep in mind you have to modify the code to
where you store your iso files, and have to modify it to do what is
needed to make the iso run.

$ cat /etc/grub.d/20a_Mageia_isos_xx__grub
#! /bin/sh

#******************************************************************************
#* 20a_Mageia_isos_xx__grub - boots image for Network/hard drive installs
#*
#* Assumptions
#* downloaded Mageia iso files are in the "/spare" partition
#* and the partition is labeled spare.
#*
#* If not, change the _iso_loc variable to match partition
#* name and label.
#*
#* Install procedure:
#* save script in /etc/grub.d/
#* chmod +x /etc/grub.d/20a_Mageia_isos_xx__grub
#*
#* and rebuild /boot/grub*/grub.cfg with
#* update-grub
#* or update-grub2 depending on your install
#*
#*
#* Note: name of script dictates location in menu. Run
#* ls -1 /etc/grub.d/*_* to see menu selection order.
#*
#* You may need to change vmlinuz command line arguments to match
#* your setup. To get curren list of arguments, run
#* cat /proc/cmdline
#*
#* This is free software released to public domain.
#* Do with it whatever you want.
#*
#*
#******************************************************************************

set +e

prefix="/usr"
exec_prefix="/usr"
datarootdir="/usr/share"

. "/usr/share/grub/grub-mkconfig_lib"

_iso_fn=""
_iso_loc="spare"
_root='${root}'


export TEXTDOMAIN=grub
export TEXTDOMAINDIR="${datarootdir}/locale"



#*********************************************************
#* create grub2 menu stanza using iso name as menuentry
#* GRUB_CMDLINE_* variables are found in /etc/default/grub
#*********************************************************

iso_menu () {
cat <<EOD
menuentry '${_iso_fn}' {
insmod regexp
insmod part_gpt
insmod gzio
insmod ext2
search --no-floppy --label --set=root $_iso_loc
loopback loop ($_root)/$_iso_fn
linux (loop)/isolinux/x86_64/vmlinuz vga=791 noiswmd nokmsboot
initrd (loop)/isolinux/x86_64/all.rdz
}
EOD

}

#***********************************************************
#* look through /$_iso_loc for Mageia*.iso files
#* and create a menu entry using its name.
#***********************************************************

_tmp_fn="/tmp/20a_Mageia_isos_xx__grub.tmp"
_exclude_list="_NETWORK_|bkup|dvd|VBoxGuestAdditions"

ls -1 /$_iso_loc/Mageia*.iso | grep -vE "$_exclude_list" > $_tmp_fn
while read -r line; do
_size=$(stat --format=%s $line)
if [ $_size -gt 400000 ] ; then
_iso_fn=${line##*/}
iso_menu
fi
done < $_tmp_fn

rm --force $_tmp_fn

#******************* end /etc/grub.d/20a_Mageia_isos_xx__grub **************
jrg
2018-05-30 16:52:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
unless you want to build your iso file yourself.
Thanks Henrik, that is where I thought I was headed - no big deal.
Loading...