Discussion:
CD/DVD drive slot or tray
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root
2018-11-19 15:47:44 UTC
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After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.

Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
Thanks.
jjge
2018-11-19 18:39:29 UTC
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Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
Thanks.
Interesting. I had the same problem for a long time. Now it seems to
have vanished (although that may also be because I am using CDs less
often nowadays).
Anyway, I share your problem, and I am just as interested in any answer.
Peter Chant
2018-11-19 19:56:12 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
Thanks.
Interesting. I had the same problem for a long time. Now it seems to
have vanished (although that may also be because I am using CDs less
often nowadays).
Anyway, I share your problem, and I am just as interested in any answer.
I have the opposite problem on my laptop. The empty tray opens
commanded fairly frequently. Desktop no issue.

Pete
Eli the Bearded
2018-11-19 22:01:32 UTC
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Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
Can't say this has been an issue for me. Maybe you want one of those old
caddy drives that have a push-button to eject the caddy. (But I can't
remember the last time I saw one.)

Of course, I generally make "obsolescence" jokes about those shiny
disks. (Although I still do purchase them, particularly for movies.)

Elijah
------
once had a hinged top "Sony Discman" style CD drive
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-11-20 07:09:21 UTC
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After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives I have. It is
a nuisance to find a paper clip to open the drive.
Are you sure that the disc is not mounted (you can check with df)? The
kernel will do its best to refuse to let you remove a disc that is
mounted.

regards Henrik
root
2018-11-20 15:25:55 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives I have. It is
a nuisance to find a paper clip to open the drive.
Are you sure that the disc is not mounted (you can check with df)? The
kernel will do its best to refuse to let you remove a disc that is
mounted.
regards Henrik
My problem comes when I want to put a disk into an empty tray.
Neither the button on the drive nor the eject command will
open the tray. I have to put a paper clip into the hole
and push the drive open to insert a disk.
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-11-21 06:55:28 UTC
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Post by root
My problem comes when I want to put a disk into an empty tray.
Neither the button on the drive nor the eject command will open the
tray. I have to put a paper clip into the hole and push the drive open
to insert a disk.
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?

The first most obvious place to look for such errors would be if any
error message is written from eject in the terminal.

Another way for eject to tell that something went wrong is to examine the
return value from eject. If this is something else than 0 it usually
means that something went wrong. The returnvalue of the previous command
is in the $? variable, example:

eject
echo $?

A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.

regards Henrik
jjge
2018-11-21 07:36:33 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by root
My problem comes when I want to put a disk into an empty tray.
Neither the button on the drive nor the eject command will open the
tray. I have to put a paper clip into the hole and push the drive open
to insert a disk.
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?
The first most obvious place to look for such errors would be if any
error message is written from eject in the terminal.
Another way for eject to tell that something went wrong is to examine the
return value from eject. If this is something else than 0 it usually
means that something went wrong. The returnvalue of the previous command
eject
echo $?
A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.
regards Henrik
In my recollection, there never was an error message or indication. And
the drive made sounds as if it was trying to open-- it just did not
move. It looked as if it was stuck. So I had a paperclip at hand (did
not have to look for it).
Chris Elvidge
2018-11-21 12:54:43 UTC
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Post by jjge
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by root
My problem comes when I want to put a disk into an empty tray.
Neither the button on the drive nor the eject command will open the
tray. I have to put a paper clip into the hole and push the drive open
to insert a disk.
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?
The first most obvious place to look for such errors would be if any
error message is written from eject in the terminal.
Another way for eject to tell that something went wrong is to examine the
return value from eject. If this is something else than 0 it usually
means that something went wrong. The returnvalue of the previous command
eject
echo $?
A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.
regards Henrik
In my recollection, there never was an error message or indication. And
the drive made sounds as if it was trying to open-- it just did not
move. It looked as if it was stuck. So I had a paperclip at hand (did
not have to look for it).
I had one of these. Turned out the clamping ring was sticking to the
drive tray and stopping the eject. Cheaper to replace it rather than
dismantle and try to fix.
--
Chris Elvidge, England
root
2018-11-21 15:31:26 UTC
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Post by Chris Elvidge
I had one of these. Turned out the clamping ring was sticking to the
drive tray and stopping the eject. Cheaper to replace it rather than
dismantle and try to fix.
Replacement is where I am: that is why I am considering a slot
drive. So far, no one has claimed any experience with
slot drives.
Chris Elvidge
2018-11-21 15:51:48 UTC
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Post by root
Post by Chris Elvidge
I had one of these. Turned out the clamping ring was sticking to the
drive tray and stopping the eject. Cheaper to replace it rather than
dismantle and try to fix.
Replacement is where I am: that is why I am considering a slot
drive. So far, no one has claimed any experience with
slot drives.
My only experience with slot drives was on a Mac. User had put in a
"small" (~3") CD. It wouldn't read or eject (as expected). Cue call to
Apple engineer.
--
Chris Elvidge, England
Rich
2018-11-21 15:52:19 UTC
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I had one of these. Turned out the clamping ring was sticking to
the drive tray and stopping the eject. Cheaper to replace it rather
than dismantle and try to fix.
Replacement is where I am: that is why I am considering a slot drive.
So far, no one has claimed any experience with slot drives.
I suspect that if you do go to a "slot" drive that you'll simply find
that the mechanical failure modes differ, but that mechanical failures
still occur.

At the price point within which CD drives compete, high quality, long
lasting, mechanical mechanisms are just likely not on the designers
radar. Instead, how cheaply can this part be made, and will it last at
least past the warranty end date, is the likely design point.
root
2018-11-21 15:29:35 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?
eject
echo $?
A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.
regards Henrik
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.

The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
maus
2018-11-22 11:16:13 UTC
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Post by root
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?
eject
echo $?
A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.
regards Henrik
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.
The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
I have not used a DVD/CD player in years, I backup to usb or cloud.
I would think it inadvisable to post as 'root'.
--
***@ireland.com
Will Rant For Food
Donald Duck
2018-11-22 14:32:43 UTC
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Post by maus
Post by root
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.
The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
I have not used a DVD/CD player in years, I backup to usb or cloud.
I would think it inadvisable to post as 'root'.
You /do/ realize that it is possible to post as anyone you want, right?
(see from field of this message). Therefore, 'root' as a Usenet name
has zero correlation to "posting using the root user to do so" in a
general sense.
Michael Black
2018-11-22 18:13:52 UTC
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Post by Donald Duck
Post by maus
Post by root
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.
The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
I have not used a DVD/CD player in years, I backup to usb or cloud.
I would think it inadvisable to post as 'root'.
You /do/ realize that it is possible to post as anyone you want, right?
(see from field of this message). Therefore, 'root' as a Usenet name
has zero correlation to "posting using the root user to do so" in a
general sense.
Except you and others do. There has to be a reason, other names could
come up just as easily if it was random.

I assumed it, as I have in the past when I think we've ahd proof that a
"root" poster was indeed running as root all of the time. I would suggest
that it does make you seem like a beginner, another assumption I made.

They've mostly disappeared, but there was a time when here we'd get lots
of posters running as root, their problems coming from that. So they find
a program that won't run as root, they want to fix it so they can, rather
than take it as a notice that they shouldn't. It's kind of amusing.

Michael
The Real Bev
2018-11-22 19:19:17 UTC
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Post by Michael Black
Post by Donald Duck
Post by maus
Post by root
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.
The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
I have not used a DVD/CD player in years, I backup to usb or cloud.
I would think it inadvisable to post as 'root'.
You /do/ realize that it is possible to post as anyone you want, right?
(see from field of this message). Therefore, 'root' as a Usenet name
has zero correlation to "posting using the root user to do so" in a
general sense.
Except you and others do. There has to be a reason, other names could
come up just as easily if it was random.
I assumed it, as I have in the past when I think we've ahd proof that a
"root" poster was indeed running as root all of the time. I would suggest
that it does make you seem like a beginner, another assumption I made.
They've mostly disappeared, but there was a time when here we'd get lots
of posters running as root, their problems coming from that. So they find
a program that won't run as root, they want to fix it so they can, rather
than take it as a notice that they shouldn't. It's kind of amusing.
As far as I know, xscreensaver is the only one that won't let me run as
root. At least it's the only one I've found. There used to be a
workaround, but that doesn't work any more. JWZ is probably getting
crotchety in his senior years.

I started running as root in 1995. I have done so much non-standard
tweaking to my system since then that I would have no idea at all how to
reproduce it as a user rather than root. It's never caused me a
problem, but it seems to infuriate others.

It's bad enough that firefox has changed significantly since FF52 -- the
last one I actually liked. To have my whole system become DIFFERENT is
more than I'm willing to tolerate.

Happy Thanksgiving anyway!
--
Cheers, Bev
"You can make a signature quote seem authoritative by
attributing it to a famous person." --- Sun Tzu
Mike Spencer
2018-11-23 07:24:14 UTC
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Post by The Real Bev
As far as I know, xscreensaver is the only one that won't let me run as
root. At least it's the only one I've found. There used to be a
workaround, but that doesn't work any more.
On my system, if I've started X as a normal user, by default root
can't run X apps. That can be altered with:

xhost +local:***@localhost

A similar situation occurs if you telnet into another computer and
want to run, say, a browser to appear on the same display as your
telnet window. xhost can fix that up.
Post by The Real Bev
I started running as root in 1995. I have done so much non-standard
tweaking to my system since then that I would have no idea at all how to
reproduce it as a user rather than root. It's never caused me a
problem, but it seems to infuriate others.
I buy the notion that running as root can lead to messes or even
calamities. But I have a xterm open all the time, su'd to root,
running emacs with two shell buffers. It gets fairly frequent use,
e.g. running tail -f /var/log/debug or improving cgi-bin scripts that
fetch and edit webpages before the browser sees them.
Post by The Real Bev
It's bad enough that firefox has changed significantly since FF52 -- the
last one I actually liked. To have my whole system become DIFFERENT is
more than I'm willing to tolerate.
Just so. Don't get me started.

On the DVD matter, I see a curious bug. On my laptop, eject (as a
user) will work only once per boot sesion. eject -v says it succeeds
with the CD-ROM eject command. A second or any other try fails. But
eject by root works and -v shows that the CD-ROM eject command failed
but SCSI commands worked. I have no idea how the CD-ROM code (or
related ioctl) can can set a never-again flag. Another reason to
occasionally be root.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
The Real Bev
2018-11-23 17:49:35 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
On the DVD matter, I see a curious bug. On my laptop, eject (as a
user) will work only once per boot sesion. eject -v says it succeeds
with the CD-ROM eject command. A second or any other try fails. But
eject by root works and -v shows that the CD-ROM eject command failed
but SCSI commands worked. I have no idea how the CD-ROM code (or
related ioctl) can can set a never-again flag. Another reason to
occasionally be root.
I just push the button. I need the exercise!
--
Cheers, Bev
This is Usenet. We *are* the trained body for dealing
with psychotics. -- A. Dingley
Jim Diamond
2018-11-28 00:52:32 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
Post by The Real Bev
As far as I know, xscreensaver is the only one that won't let me run as
root. At least it's the only one I've found. There used to be a
workaround, but that doesn't work any more.
On my system, if I've started X as a normal user, by default root
A similar situation occurs if you telnet into another computer
telnet? Mike, Mike, Mike.

ssh -Y is your friend.
Henrik Carlqvist
2018-11-28 07:15:16 UTC
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Post by Jim Diamond
On my system, if I've started X as a normal user, by default root can't
A similar situation occurs if you telnet into another computer
telnet? Mike, Mike, Mike.
ssh -Y is your friend.
Yes, today ssh is usually the most convenient way to run remote X
applications. However, even today there are still situations when you
prefer to use xhost and more or less manually set the DISPLAY variable on
the remote machine.

All the X traffic is encrypted and decrypted when going through the ssh
tunnel. If your X application is doing something like showing high
resolution, high framerate graphics you might prefer to send that
graphics on your network without the performance penalty given by
encryption and decryption.

regards Henrik

Jimmy Johnson
2018-11-26 22:25:17 UTC
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Post by root
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Does the eject command indicate some kind of error?
eject
echo $?
A third place to look for errors is in the output from dmesg.
regards Henrik
eject returns 0 and there is no entry in dmesg.
The system thinks the tray opens. It tries to open
but it is a mechanical failure.
It broke, probably while the tray was forced closed or maybe it was
grabbed while closing, that's why they have a button on them. I test
systems and sometimes I have to hold the button while restarting because
there is no pin hole. I suggest you replace it with another that's also
tray. Both tray or slot will break if forced. Slot drives are used
where there is not enough room for a full tray drive. When you insert a
disc in a slot drive it will grab the disc and pull it on in. Do not
force a disc into a slot drive it will break the drive.

I own three slot drives and if one breaks I will replace it with the same.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 14.2 - KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
Jimmy Johnson
2018-11-20 07:46:03 UTC
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Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
Thanks.
Using kde4 you can eject a disk from the tray's Device icon. Also you
can load and eject from k3b.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Devuan Jessie - KDE 4.14.2 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda2
Registered Linux User #380263
root
2018-11-20 15:27:27 UTC
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Post by Jimmy Johnson
Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
Thanks.
Using kde4 you can eject a disk from the tray's Device icon. Also you
can load and eject from k3b.
An affected drive just makes a noise in response to the eject command.
I was hoping no such problem affected slot drives.
notbob
2018-11-20 13:07:24 UTC
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Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
It's a common problem. It's caused by a small o-ring becoming too
stretched and loose. I've tossed a perfectly good external drive due to
this exact problem. There are Youtube videos that explain the problem
and provide possible remedies.

My newer W10 box (HP) has a pop out CD/DVD player. It jes "pops" out,
like it's spring loaded. It's also vertical. The tray jes pops out and
I gotta manually push it back in.
Post by root
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
What is a "slot" drive? Is the above --in my W10 box-- a "slot" drive?

nb
Jimmy Johnson
2018-11-20 17:17:48 UTC
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Post by root
After a while the tray fails to open on all cd/dvd drives
I have. It is a nuisance to find a paper clip to open
the drive.
It's a common problem.  It's caused by a small o-ring becoming too
stretched and loose.  I've tossed a perfectly good external drive due to
this exact problem.  There are Youtube videos that explain the problem
and provide possible remedies.
My newer W10 box (HP) has a pop out CD/DVD player.  It jes "pops" out,
like it's spring loaded.  It's also vertical.  The tray jes pops out and
I gotta manually push it back in.
Is that SATA or IDE?
Post by root
Do slot drives have any similar shortcoming?
What is a "slot" drive?  Is the above --in my W10 box-- a "slot" drive?
Do you push the disc into a slot or put it on a tray?
--
Jimmy Johnson

Devuan Jessie - KDE 4.14.2 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda2
Registered Linux User #380263
notbob
2018-11-22 22:25:27 UTC
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Post by Jimmy Johnson
Do you push the disc into a slot or put it on a tray?
Neither. It is not a "tray" you can put a Coke can on, but a vertical
(disc arranged with the disc 90 degrees from horizontal) tray-like
projection that is propelled outward by some kinda spring mechanism,
which I then hafta push in, by hand. No electro-mechanical mechanism
ejects a "tray". ;)

nb
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