Discussion:
Installing a VirtualBox VM in a physical system
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James H. Markowitz
2018-11-05 03:48:55 UTC
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I have a Slackware VM that I have taken some time tuning up and
configuring. What I would like to do now is to take the VM and install it
as native in actual iron. If anybody in this forum has tackled this issue
I would be interested to learn about their experiences.
Grant Taylor
2018-11-05 06:20:32 UTC
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Post by James H. Markowitz
I have a Slackware VM that I have taken some time tuning up and
configuring. What I would like to do now is to take the VM and install
it as native in actual iron. If anybody in this forum has tackled this
issue I would be interested to learn about their experiences.
I've not done that particular task. But I have done something similar a
number of times.

Linux is quite forgiving about moving hardware. It's possible, and not
overly difficult, to copy an install from one piece of (virtual)
hardware to another piece of (virtual) hardware.

Make sure that your disks are functionally the same and that your broad
platform type (BIOS vs EFI) is the same. Copy data from the source to
the destination. Install the boot loader. Tweak settings for
differences between the hardware, like the NIC's MAC address.

It's possible to overcome bigger changes (different disk / file system
layout, processor, memory, maybe even BIOS vs EFI) but they do take more
work. I suggest that you stick with as close as reasonably possible
when first trying.

If it helps, I've used this method both personally and professionally
for the last 10+ years. I've successfully restored multiple systems
from full backups using this method many a time. I've also done similar
to restore Solaris systems.
--
Grant. . . .
unix || die
Bit Twister
2018-11-05 08:07:00 UTC
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Post by James H. Markowitz
I have a Slackware VM that I have taken some time tuning up and
configuring. What I would like to do now is to take the VM and install it
as native in actual iron. If anybody in this forum has tackled this issue
I would be interested to learn about their experiences.
Hmm, without looking, I would
1. create, format, label target hardware partitions
2. download systemrescuecd.iso from http://www.sysresccd.org
3. clone the vm
4. attach systemrescuecd.iso to the cloned vm
5. boot the clone, create a mount point, mount the clone's drive
6. Modify /etc/fstab, /etc/hostname, /etc/hosts, network configuration file

You might want to bookmark the following url
https://encrypted.google.com/advanced_search
and put
copy virtualbox to real hardware
in the box to see what you can see.

And create a check list of any additional steps required to manage the
project.
m***@privacy.net
2018-11-05 23:42:56 UTC
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Post by James H. Markowitz
I have a Slackware VM that I have taken some time tuning up and
configuring. What I would like to do now is to take the VM and install
it as native in actual iron. If anybody in this forum has tackled this
issue I would be interested to learn about their experiences.
1. Attach the new physical harddrive(s) to your host

2. Mount the virtual disk(s) on your host using (Google: mount vdi)

3. Use dd to clone the virtual disk(s) onto the physical one(s)
Bit Twister
2018-11-05 23:53:44 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
Post by James H. Markowitz
I have a Slackware VM that I have taken some time tuning up and
configuring. What I would like to do now is to take the VM and install
it as native in actual iron. If anybody in this forum has tackled this
issue I would be interested to learn about their experiences.
1. Attach the new physical harddrive(s) to your host
2. Mount the virtual disk(s) on your host using (Google: mount vdi)
3. Use dd to clone the virtual disk(s) onto the physical one(s)
I would use rsync if it were me. If target drive has other partitions,
dd would wipe the partition table. :(
Grant Taylor
2018-11-05 23:58:14 UTC
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Post by m***@privacy.net
3. Use dd to clone the virtual disk(s) onto the physical one(s)
Be mindful of partition layout changes / size / geometry.

I'd be more inclined to dd a file system than an entire drive. Even
then, you're likely going to need to use FS specific tools to adjust the
size (grow) the file system.
--
Grant. . . .
unix || die
m***@privacy.net
2018-11-06 16:04:37 UTC
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Post by Grant Taylor
Post by m***@privacy.net
3. Use dd to clone the virtual disk(s) onto the physical one(s)
Be mindful of partition layout changes / size / geometry.
I'd be more inclined to dd a file system than an entire drive. Even
then, you're likely going to need to use FS specific tools to adjust the
size (grow) the file system.
Well, I like simple solutions. Therefore I'd prefere to dd an entire
drive first than use (g)parted on the target drive - if necessary at all.
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