Discussion:
Anything "between" -14.2 and -current?
(too old to reply)
John Forkosh
2018-09-17 09:58:48 UTC
Permalink
Something like -recommended ... Given the several recent
threads discussing the merits and demerits of -current
versus -14.2, my personal approach has been to wait for
the next stable numbered release. But that's just me and my
personal needs/use, which is for a Unix program development
platform, and emacs has been working pretty well for a long
time now. Nevertheless, I do manually update a few things like
firefox/flash, and when I needed support for Intel 620 graphics,
etc, but I get that stuff from their own sites, not slack packages.

But what might be useful, and maybe even tempting, would be
a pretty-darn-stable (if not quite as stable as 14.2 itself),
let's call it, slackware-recommended/ and slackware64-recommended/.
That's somewhere "in-between" -14.2 and -current, which contains
updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g., security), or really
useful (e.g., new kernels with useful features/fixes), or really
whatever. And also way beyond just the testing phase characterizing
-current, i.e., pretty-darn-stable.

Given the long gestation periods between slackware releases (even
elephants give birth quicker:), such intermediate semi-stable
semi-releases might be semi-warranted.
--
John Forkosh ( mailto: ***@f.com where j=john and f=forkosh )
Rich
2018-09-17 10:16:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Forkosh
But what might be useful, and maybe even tempting, would be
a pretty-darn-stable (if not quite as stable as 14.2 itself),
let's call it, slackware-recommended/ and slackware64-recommended/.
That's somewhere "in-between" -14.2 and -current, which contains
updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g., security),
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2
security patches. Just monitor the security list (or the security list
archives) and apply the security patches that are released. Then you
get "14.2 with updates considered important".

Sometimes there are also patches for non-security items (rare, but it
does happen). Just check the patches/ file tree for the release you've
installed.
Post by John Forkosh
or really useful (e.g., new kernels with useful features/fixes), or
really whatever. And also way beyond just the testing phase
characterizing -current, i.e., pretty-darn-stable.
Given the long gestation periods between slackware releases (even
elephants give birth quicker:), such intermediate semi-stable
semi-releases might be semi-warranted.
Yes, but all you've described is a Slackware with shorter gestation
periods. If it is taking 1.5 years to get to X, you'll end up finding
it taking 1.5 years to get to your idea of "-recommended" (which is
just an alternate name for a next release point).

So unless you are going to help the slack team out so they can speed
things up to get to the next point release, this isn't likely to
happen.
Clark Smith
2018-09-17 12:28:02 UTC
Permalink
But what might be useful, and maybe even tempting, would be a
pretty-darn-stable (if not quite as stable as 14.2 itself), let's call
it, slackware-recommended/ and slackware64-recommended/.
That's somewhere "in-between" -14.2 and -current, which contains
updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g., security),
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2 security
patches.
Not quite the same thing - 14.2 patch remains obsolete in some
areas.
Rich
2018-09-17 14:27:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clark Smith
But what might be useful, and maybe even tempting, would be a
pretty-darn-stable (if not quite as stable as 14.2 itself), let's call
it, slackware-recommended/ and slackware64-recommended/.
That's somewhere "in-between" -14.2 and -current, which contains
updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g., security),
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2 security
patches.
Not quite the same thing - 14.2 patch remains obsolete in some
areas.
It may not be as "current cutting edge" as other distros that ride the
bleeding edge, but they are security patches to 14.2 (i.e., in the OP's
words: "which contains updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g.,
security)".

They don't include that "project X has issued V10, but 14.2 is on V8 of
X" type updates. But those would have been included in the OP's other
half of his idea.
Clark Smith
2018-09-17 19:05:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich
Post by Clark Smith
Post by Rich
But what might be useful, and maybe even tempting, would be a
pretty-darn-stable (if not quite as stable as 14.2 itself), let's
call it, slackware-recommended/ and slackware64-recommended/.
That's somewhere "in-between" -14.2 and -current, which contains
updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g., security),
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2
security patches.
Not quite the same thing - 14.2 patch remains obsolete in some
areas.
It may not be as "current cutting edge" as other distros that ride the
bleeding edge, but they are security patches to 14.2 (i.e., in the OP's
words: "which contains updates to -14.2 considered important (e.g.,
security)".
They don't include that "project X has issued V10, but 14.2 is on V8 of
X" type updates. But those would have been included in the OP's other
half of his idea.
What I have in mind is that more and more applications are
dependent on QT5 - which is not officially part of Slackware 14.2. Even
the Slackware QT5 packages that can be found in Slackbuilds are too old
for many applications; apparently, getting newer versions of QT5 to build
in 14.2 is nontrivial, or even not possible, because some software it
depends on is just too old.

I am all for stability, and wary of bleeding edge stuff, but I am
also not enthusiastic about getting left behind.
root
2018-09-17 15:03:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2
security patches. Just monitor the security list (or the security list
archives) and apply the security patches that are released. Then you
get "14.2 with updates considered important".
What is needed is another option to slackpkg:

slackpg security
or
slackpkg patches

to be run periodically.
Dan C
2018-09-17 15:52:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2
security patches. Just monitor the security list (or the security list
archives) and apply the security patches that are released. Then you
get "14.2 with updates considered important".
slackpg security or slackpkg patches
to be run periodically.
Real Slackers don't use crap like "slackpkg".

Word.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as Rabbit pushed him off the speeding train.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
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John Forkosh
2018-09-18 00:49:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by root
Post by Rich
This already exists, except it is simply named what it is, 14.2
security patches. Just monitor the security list (or the security list
archives) and apply the security patches that are released. Then you
get "14.2 with updates considered important".
slackpg security
or
slackpkg patches
to be run periodically.
Yeah, that would work for me -- all I originally meant was
identifying the >>subset of -current packages<< that's
officially or semi-officially deemed "pretty-darn-stable",
meaning way past alpha testing, maybe even past beta.
And maybe it would be nice if PACKAGES.TXT simply contained
an additional comment indicating some assessment of package
stability, e.g., -alpha, -alpha+, -beta, -beta+, -stable.
Then all packages in a numbered release would presumably be
-stable, whereas -current would have a mix. But then users
would have another (and I'd think important for some users,
like me) criteria for selecting packages they want to install
on their running system.

I wasn't trying to suggest creating anything new, i.e., not
a differently-constructed collection of packages comprising
some "slackware-recommended" distribution different from
-current. Just the subset of packages already in -current
that I (and presumably others like me, judging from the
several recent threads I mentioned in original post) might
want to install, and would feel comfortable/safe installing.
Merely some kind of "stability comment" in PACKAGES.TXT
would go a pretty long way towards getting there. Maybe even
an upgradepkg option to "install xxxx or better" where xxxx
could be any of those -alpha, -alpha+, etc, indicators.
--
John Forkosh ( mailto: ***@f.com where j=john and f=forkosh )
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