Discussion:
Legacy GRUB on Slackware64
(too old to reply)
Dan C
2018-04-18 15:20:12 UTC
Permalink
I'm a fan of the "old" GRUB bootloader, now known as grub-legacy. The
"new" GRUB2 seems ridiculously verbose, complicated, and too "automated".

I'm using Slackware64 14.2, which of course uses the LILO bootloader by
default. That's fine, usually. I'm having some troubles getting it to
find/load other Linux distributions loaded on the same hard drive, but
that's not my point here. I see that the old GRUB is not, and has not
been, part of the 64 bit Slackwares for quite a while. Further research
indicates it does not run on 64 bit systems. However.... I found a couple
of "repositories" that had pre-compiled packages for Slack64 of the legacy
GRUB. I uninstalled the GRUB2 package on my Slackware64 install,
installed this legacy GRUB package, and installed/configured it the way I
always have. Everything acted normal, but when I rebooted, I ended up at
the GRUB prompt and could do nothing further to get anything to boot.
Ended up using "SystemRescueCD" to boot with and re-ran LILO, which worked.

So....... my question is: Is the legacy-GRUB in fact non-compatible with
Slackware64? Is that why it wouldn't boot, even after what seemed to be a
normal install (with normal responses from GRUB when setting root/MBR)?
If that is true, why was I able to find 64-bit packages of legacy-GRUB?

Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the vmlinuz/initrd
filenames on another partition for another Linux distro (Mint in this
case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in lilo.conf, but it
gives a fatal error and says that image can't be found.

Thanks for advice!
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as the woodpecker approached his hot-air balloon.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: Loading Image...
Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 00:01:16 UTC
Permalink
I see that the old GRUB is not, and has not been, part of the
64 bit Slackwares for quite a while.
In fact it has NEVER been a part of any Slackware release:
when Pat added grub to 14.1 it was straight the 2.00 version:
Wed Sep 18 02:56:19 UTC 2013
Hey folks, I'm calling this a beta!
(some lines skipped)
a/grub-2.00-i486-1.txz: Added.
cq
a/grub-2.00-x86_64-1.txz: Added.
Welcome GRUB!
and that was the first time Pat added anything else then lilo to any
Slackware release. Only in -current he updated to grub 2.02
the GRUB prompt and could do nothing further to get anything to boot.
Probably the stage 2 loader do not switch to 64-bit correctly.
In itself I have used grub-legacy in openSUSE with 64-bit kernels,
so it IS possible, but then, of course, I used an openSUSE package for
that grub loader.
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the vmlinuz/initrd
filenames on another partition for another Linux distro (Mint in this
case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in lilo.conf, but it
gives a fatal error and says that image can't be found.
Is that other partition mounted at the time lilo is RUN and is the
pathname TO it that of the mounted partition?
I.e.
mount /dev/<whatever> /mnt/mint

and the lilo.conf then has
image /mnt/mint/boot/vmlinuz
initrd /mnt/mint/boot/initrd
because in Slackware the lilo _program_ must be able to find those
files, as to determine their absolute location on the disk.

Another option is to copy the Mint kernel and initrd into Slackware's
/boot cq use a common, small, /boot partition for both Linux distro's.
Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 13:43:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eef Hartman
In itself I have used grub-legacy in openSUSE with 64-bit kernels,
By the way, legacy-grub IS incompatible with GPT-partioned disks:
they both need the blocks after the MBR for their own purposes
GPT pation table is there but grub wants to put its stage 1.5 code in
those blocks.
Post by Eef Hartman
so it IS possible, but then, of course, I used an openSUSE package for
that grub loader.
This was with a normal DOS-type partition table (and root disks, no
larger then 512 MB).
Dan C
2018-04-19 14:04:18 UTC
Permalink
I see that the old GRUB is not, and has not been, part of the 64 bit
Slackwares for quite a while.
Wed Sep 18 02:56:19 UTC 2013 Hey folks, I'm calling this a beta!
(some lines skipped)
a/grub-2.00-i486-1.txz: Added.
cq a/grub-2.00-x86_64-1.txz: Added.
Welcome GRUB!
and that was the first time Pat added anything else then lilo to any
Slackware release. Only in -current he updated to grub 2.02
Well........ in the 32-bit versions it (GRUB-legacy) was included in
/extra, up through version 14.0. Looks like it was never in 64 bit
though. As I said, I've been using it for years in 32-bit.
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the
vmlinuz/initrd filenames on another partition for another Linux distro
(Mint in this case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in
lilo.conf, but it gives a fatal error and says that image can't be
found.
Is that other partition mounted at the time lilo is RUN and is the
pathname TO it that of the mounted partition?
I.e.
mount /dev/<whatever> /mnt/mint
and the lilo.conf then has image /mnt/mint/boot/vmlinuz initrd
/mnt/mint/boot/initrd because in Slackware the lilo _program_ must be
able to find those files, as to determine their absolute location on the
disk.
OK, that's the problem, right there. It is not mounted at boot time. Not
completely sure how to do that (fstab?), or even if I would *want* it (the
Mint partition) mounted when using Slackware... Hmmmmm.
Another option is to copy the Mint kernel and initrd into Slackware's
/boot cq use a common, small, /boot partition for both Linux distro's.
Yes, those may be viable options. Thanks.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he hacked up a hairball.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 14:45:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan C
OK, that's the problem, right there. It is not mounted at boot time.
It doesn't have to be mounted at BOOT time (in fact, NO partitions are
mounted at boot time at all - lilo doesn't have filesystem support,
unlike grub), only when the kernel starts it will access/mount
/dev/root whatever partition will be the root.
But it DOES have to be mounted at the moment /sbin/lilo is run (and
the pathnames in /etc/lilo.conf have to be correct AT that time), for
that program (/sbin/lilo) to be able to create the map file OF the
kernel and optional initrd files to be loaded by lilo, the boot loader
(which will be written to the MBR or the boot block of the
partition(s), mentioned as root = in lilo's config).
So the root= and the pathname of the kernel for Mint do not have to be
the same fs, as /sbin/lilo is run when _Slackware_ is active and ITS
root partition will be / at that time and so all pathnames are
"as Slackware sees them", not as Mint will see them after the reboot.

As said before, when /boot is a separate partition, it will be /boot
in all of the Linux versions (but it still has to be mounted at the
time you execute /sbin/lilo, though not for _running_ the system).
BTW: this, of course, is true for grub-legacy too, it needs to read
its stage 1 and stage1.5 files, as well as the menu.
I don't know which version of grub Linux Mint is using, but it can
boot Slackware too, of course, as long as it can see its
kernel/initrd.
Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 14:59:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eef Hartman
/dev/root whatever partition will be the root.
^
The word to is missing there.
So, although it's done internally, the equivalent of
mount -n /dev/root /
is executed by the kernel (potentially after the initrd was loaded
and became temporarily the / disk).

All other mounts are done by the rc file(s), so after the kernel is
complete loaded and it transfers control to init cq systemd (etc.)
Dan C
2018-04-20 01:29:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eef Hartman
Post by Dan C
OK, that's the problem, right there. It is not mounted at boot time.
It doesn't have to be mounted at BOOT time (in fact, NO partitions are
mounted at boot time at all - lilo doesn't have filesystem support,
unlike grub), only when the kernel starts it will access/mount /dev/root
whatever partition will be the root.
But it DOES have to be mounted at the moment /sbin/lilo is run (and the
pathnames in /etc/lilo.conf have to be correct AT that time), for that
program (/sbin/lilo) to be able to create the map file OF the kernel and
optional initrd files to be loaded by lilo, the boot loader (which will
be written to the MBR or the boot block of the partition(s), mentioned
as root = in lilo's config).
So the root= and the pathname of the kernel for Mint do not have to be
the same fs, as /sbin/lilo is run when _Slackware_ is active and ITS
root partition will be / at that time and so all pathnames are "as
Slackware sees them", not as Mint will see them after the reboot.
As said before, when /boot is a separate partition, it will be /boot in
all of the Linux versions (but it still has to be mounted at the time
you execute /sbin/lilo, though not for _running_ the system). BTW: this,
of course, is true for grub-legacy too, it needs to read its stage 1 and
stage1.5 files, as well as the menu.
I don't know which version of grub Linux Mint is using, but it can boot
Slackware too, of course, as long as it can see its kernel/initrd.
All right, thanks for the detailed info, Eef. Makes sense to me now, but
somehow it doesn't seem "right" to me to have Mint/other kernels/initrd's
in my Slackware /boot directory, and I'm not about to re-do the partition
layout on the disk to have a dedicated /boot partition for all distros to
share.

I think the wisest thing to do is bite the bullet and learn how to
configure and manage this Grub2 thing. Seems pretty much all distros now
use that, including "modern" Slackware, so probably time to use it.

Thanks again for all your help.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he slipped his date a Purple Microdot.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
root
2018-04-20 16:07:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan C
I think the wisest thing to do is bite the bullet and learn how to
configure and manage this Grub2 thing. Seems pretty much all distros now
use that, including "modern" Slackware, so probably time to use it.
I had to switch to grub because lilo did not support an M.2 PCI-e
ssd that I wanted to use. I wrote and posted in this newsgroup
lilo2cfg which reads a lilo.conf and generates a grub config
file which I direct to /boot/grub/grub.cfg. The Slackware grub
package includes grub-mkconfig which searches all your drives
and sets up a horribly complicated grub.cfg.

Here is my program lilo2cfg.c:

/*
Program to read /etc/lilo.conf and generate grub.cfg
*/
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <termio.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <string.h>

#define LINESIZE 256
char linebuff[LINESIZE];
char appendstr[LINESIZE];
char vgastr[LINESIZE];
char imagestr[LINESIZE];
char rootstr[LINESIZE];
char labelstr[LINESIZE];

FILE *infd;
char *ptre,*ptrx;

char *parse()
{
ptre=linebuff;
while(*ptre&&*ptre!='=') ++ptre;
if(!*ptre) return (char *) 0;
++ptre;
while(*ptre&&*ptre==' ' ) ++ptre;
ptrx=ptre;
}

int parseappend()
{
ptre=linebuff;
while(*ptre&&*ptre!='"') ++ptre;
if(!*ptre) return 0;
++ptre;
ptrx=ptre;
while(*ptrx&&*ptrx!='"') ++ptrx;
*ptrx=0;
strcpy(appendstr,ptre);
//printf("APPEND %s\n",appendstr);
}
int parsevga()
{
parse();
strcpy(vgastr,ptre);
//printf("VGA %s\n",vgastr);
}
int parseimage()
{
parse();
strcpy(imagestr,ptre);
//printf("IMAGE %s\n",imagestr);
}
int parseroot()
{
parse();
strcpy(rootstr,ptre);
//printf("ROOT %s\n",rootstr);
}
int parselabel()
{
parse();
strcpy(labelstr,ptre);
//printf("LABEL %s\n",labelstr);
}
/*
menuentry 'Bx:k64.5.2' {
#set root='(hd2,4)'
search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 62967738-1c76-4a06-85f2-e6b980427279
linux /boot/k64.5.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sdb1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 vga = 791
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
menuentry 'B1:k64.5.2' {
set root='(hd1,1)'
linux /boot/k64.5.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sdb1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 vga = 791
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
menuentry 'A1:k64.5.2' {
set root='(hd0,1)'
linux /boot/k64.5.2 root=/dev/sda1 load_ramdisk=1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 vga = 791
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
menuentry 'C4:k64.5.2' {
set root='(hd2,4)'
linux /boot/k64.5.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sdc4 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 vga = 791
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
*/



int parsero()
{
int hd,part;
char *ptr;
char strroot[16];

ptr=strstr(rootstr,"/sd");
ptr+=3;
hd=*ptr-'a';
++ptr;
sprintf(strroot,"\'(hd%d,%c)\'",hd,*ptr);



printf("menuentry \'%s\' {\n",labelstr);
printf("#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root %s\n",strroot);
printf("root=%s\n",strroot);
//printf("#linux %s load_ramdisk=1 root=%s prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 %s vga=%s\n",imagestr,rootstr,appendstr,vgastr);
printf("linux %s load_ramdisk=1 root=%s prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 %s gfxpayoad=1024x768x64\n",imagestr,rootstr,appendstr);
printf("initrd /boot/initrd.gz\n}\n\n");

}






int main(argc,argv)
int argc;
char *argv[];
{
char *ptr;

if((infd=fopen("/etc/lilo.conf","r"))==0){
// printf("Cannot open /etc/lilo.conf\n");
exit(2);
}
while(fgets(linebuff,LINESIZE,infd)){
linebuff[strlen(linebuff)-1]=0;
ptr=linebuff;
while(*ptr==' ' ) ++ptr;
if(*ptr=='#') continue;
if(strncmp(ptr,"append",6)==0){
parseappend();
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"timeout",7)==0){
printf("set ");
while(*ptr){
if(*ptr!=' ') putchar(*ptr);
++ptr;
}
putchar('\n');
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"vga",3)==0){
parsevga();
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"image",5)==0){
parseimage();
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"root",4)==0){
parseroot();
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"label",5)==0){
parselabel();
continue;
}
if(strncmp(ptr,"read-only",9)==0){
parsero();
continue;
}
// printf("##%s\n",linebuff);
}
fclose(infd);
exit(0);
}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Starting with this lilo.conf:
# LILO configuration file
# generated by 'liloconfig'
#
# Start LILO global section
# Append any additional kernel parameters:
append=" vt.default_utf8=0"
boot = /dev/sda

#compact # faster, but won't work on all systems.

## Boot BMP Image.
## Bitmap in BMP format: 640x480x8
# bitmap = /boot/slack.bmp
# Menu colors (foreground, background, shadow, highlighted
# foreground, highlighted background, highlighted shadow):
# bmp-colors = 255,0,255,0,255,0
# Location of the option table: location x, location y, number of
# columns, lines per column (max 15), "spill" (this is how many
# entries must be in the first column before the next begins to
# be used. We don't specify it here, as there's just one column.
# bmp-table = 60,6,1,16
# Timer location x, timer location y, foreground color,
# background color, shadow color.
# bmp-timer = 65,27,0,255

# Standard menu.
# Or, you can comment out the bitmap menu above and
# use a boot message with the standard menu:
#message = /boot/boot_message.txt

# Wait until the timeout to boot (if commented out, boot the
# first entry immediately):
prompt
# Timeout before the first entry boots.
# This is given in tenths of a second, so 600 for every minute:
timeout = 120
# Override dangerous defaults that rewrite the partition table:
change-rules
reset
# VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x64k
vga = 791
# Normal VGA console
#vga = normal
# Ask for video mode at boot (time out to normal in 30s)
#vga = ask
# VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x64k
#vga=791
# VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x32k
#vga=790
# VESA framebuffer console @ 1024x768x256
#vga=773
# VESA framebuffer console @ 800x600x64k
#vga=788
# VESA framebuffer console @ 800x600x32k
#vga=787
# VESA framebuffer console @ 800x600x256
#vga=771
# VESA framebuffer console @ 640x480x64k
#vga=785
# VESA framebuffer console @ 640x480x32k
#vga=784
# VESA framebuffer console @ 640x480x256
#vga=769
# End LILO global section
# Linux bootable partition config begins
image = /boot/k64.8.10
root = /dev/sdb1
label = B1:k64.8.10
read-only
image = /boot/k64.8.10
root = /dev/sda1
label = A1:k64.8.10
read-only
# Linux bootable partition config ends
------------------------------------------------------------------

lilo2cfg generates this grub.cfg file:
set timeout=120
menuentry 'B1:k64.8.10' {
#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root '(hd1,1)'
root='(hd1,1)'
linux /boot/k64.8.10 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sdb1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}

menuentry 'A1:k64.8.10' {
#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root '(hd0,1)'
root='(hd0,1)'
linux /boot/k64.8.10 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sda1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------


In my case I had to modify this to include the M.2 ssd. Here is my current /boot/grub/grub.cfg:


set timeout=10
set vga=791
menuentry 'N1:k4.15.2' {
search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root=UUID 4b425c75-bac7-417e-8290-758eb8147f43
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=UUID=4b425c75-bac7-417e-8290-758eb8147f43 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}

menuentry 'B1:k4.15.2' {
root='(hd1,1)'
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sdb1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}


menuentry 'A1:k4.15.2' {
#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root '(hd0,1)'
root='(hd0,1)'
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sda1 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}

menuentry 'A2:k4.15.2' {
#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root '(hd0,2)'
root='(hd0,2)'
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sda2 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}

menuentry 'A4:k4.15.2' {
#search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root '(hd0,4)'
root='(hd0,4)'
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=/dev/sda4 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


The only thing new in the above is the entry for the M.2 device:

menuentry 'N1:k4.15.2' {
search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root=UUID 4b425c75-bac7-417e-8290-758eb8147f43
linux /boot/k4.15.2 load_ramdisk=1 root=UUID=4b425c75-bac7-417e-8290-758eb8147f43 prompt_ramdisk=0 ro printk.time=0 vt.default_utf8=0 gfxpayoad=1024x768x64
initrd /boot/initrd.gz
}

Note that the --set=root differs from the lilo form. I had to use UUID because
the root device is not a /dev/sdxxx. You get the UUID information by running
the blkid command.

I found that I had to run the grub-install command from a standard /dev/sdxx
partition, it would not work if I was running in the M.2 ssd.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Keep a Slackware install disk handy when you are experimenting with grub. If you
screw up you can always boot from the install disk to get you back for another
try.

One last tip: If something screws up the boot sector grub pops into a rescue
display. I keep a little cheat sheet around that tells me how to recover. This
is that cheat sheet:

set prefix=(hd1,1)/boot/grub
set root=(hd1,1)
insmod normal
linux /boot/k64.8.10 root=/dev/sdb1
boot

which gets me back to /dev/sdb1. Note that (hd1,1) is /dev/sdb1
hd1 is /dev/sdb and the ,1 is /dev/sdb1

Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 17:34:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan C
Well........ in the 32-bit versions it (GRUB-legacy) was included in
/extra, up through version 14.0. Looks like it was never in 64 bit
though. As I said, I've been using it for years in 32-bit.
To be exact: grub-0.9x was put into /extra in Slackware 10.1 (and
always was 32-bits). The last time it was patched was in 13.0 (and
one patch WAS to handle 64-bits kernels):
extra/grub/grub-0.97-i486-7.tgz: Patched to fix loading x86-64 Linux
kernels.

That version still was there in 14.0 (last recompiled in 13.1 to -9,
unchanged in 13.37 and 14.0) but - of course - it was removed from
/extra when grub-2 came to be included in standard Slackware 14.1

And indeed: it never was there in slackware64, not even in /extra !
Giovanni
2018-04-19 06:42:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan C
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the
vmlinuz/initrd filenames on another partition for another Linux
distro (Mint in this case)? I'm positive I've referenced them
properly in lilo.conf, but it gives a fatal error and says that image
can't be found.
Put all vmlinuz and initrd files in separate partition (renaming them if
necessary) and mount the partition as /boot in all different distros.

Lilo will easily find the images to load and you can also use UUID for
selecting partitions

Ciao
Giovanni
--
A computer is like an air conditioner,
it stops working when you open Windows.
< http://giovanni.homelinux.net/ >
Dan C
2018-04-19 14:05:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Giovanni
Post by Dan C
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the
vmlinuz/initrd filenames on another partition for another Linux distro
(Mint in this case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in
lilo.conf, but it gives a fatal error and says that image can't be
found.
Put all vmlinuz and initrd files in separate partition (renaming them if
necessary) and mount the partition as /boot in all different distros.
Lilo will easily find the images to load and you can also use UUID for
selecting partitions
Yes, that makes good sense. Thanks for the reply!
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he inserted the suppository.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: http://brandybuck.site40.net/pics/politica/thanks.jpg
Dan C
2018-04-20 01:31:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Giovanni
Post by Dan C
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the
vmlinuz/initrd filenames on another partition for another Linux distro
(Mint in this case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in
lilo.conf, but it gives a fatal error and says that image can't be
found.
Put all vmlinuz and initrd files in separate partition (renaming them if
necessary) and mount the partition as /boot in all different distros.
Lilo will easily find the images to load and you can also use UUID for
selecting partitions
Ciao Giovanni
Thank you, Giovanni, but re-arranging my partition scheme is not on the
list of possible actions... :)

I'm gonna make some coffee and settle in to read up on Grub2 and start
using that, I guess.

Appreciate your time!
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"Bother!" said Pooh, as he sent another AreaFix message.
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Giovanni
2018-04-19 14:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan C
Post by Giovanni
Post by Dan C
Followup question: Why does LILO have trouble finding the
vmlinuz/initrd filenames on another partition for another Linux distro
(Mint in this case)? I'm positive I've referenced them properly in
lilo.conf, but it gives a fatal error and says that image can't be
found.
Put all vmlinuz and initrd files in separate partition (renaming them if
necessary) and mount the partition as /boot in all different distros.
Lilo will easily find the images to load and you can also use UUID for
selecting partitions
Yes, that makes good sense. Thanks for the reply!
I want to add a little hint. Put lilo.conf in the same partition and
make a link from /boot/lilo.conf to /etc/lilo.con and you will have only
one configuration file to edit. And does not matter from the distro you
are working on.

Up to now I'm using 32 bits only, so be careful mixing 32 and 64 setups.

Ciao
Giovanni
--
A computer is like an air conditioner,
it stops working when you open Windows.
< http://giovanni.homelinux.net/ >
Eef Hartman
2018-04-19 14:53:02 UTC
Permalink
And does not matter from the distro you are working on.
Linux Mint doesn't carry lilo as far as I know, so there's no
/sbin/lilo to look for that config.
The default in Mint 18.x is grub 2 (which he didn't like).
Giovanni
2018-04-19 17:02:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eef Hartman
And does not matter from the distro you are working on.
Linux Mint doesn't carry lilo as far as I know, so there's no
/sbin/lilo to look for that config.
The default in Mint 18.x is grub 2 (which he didn't like).
Well, depends if he finds easier install lilo on Mint or configure
slackware with grub. I wouldn't have any doubt.

Ciao
Giovanni
--
A computer is like an air conditioner,
it stops working when you open Windows.
< http://giovanni.homelinux.net/ >
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