Discussion:
A Very Fundamental Installation Question
(too old to reply)
Jim Sladek
2019-07-15 14:57:03 UTC
Permalink
In the Beginner's Guide directions for switching to a generic kernel,
the suggested command generator outputs an obscenely long command line
that due to various reasons I have had to enter more than once.

If memory serves, there is a way to do a copy and paste in console, but
at 78 years of age, I cannot retrieve it from my memory cells. Online
searches have not resulted in anything remotely usable.

What's the secret of success?

Jim
Jim Sladek
2019-07-15 19:11:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Sladek
What's the secret of success?
Disregard my question.

I found the secret of success .... ran console mouse support in
pkgtools. When I installed Slackware, I had no idea what that option
was at the time in Setup.

Jim
Brian Masinick
2019-07-21 16:48:57 UTC
Permalink
Congratulations on your success!

I hope you are enjoying Slackware too!
Jim Sladek
2019-07-21 19:40:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Masinick
Congratulations on your success!
I hope you are enjoying Slackware too!
Thanks, Brian. It's quite an education - much different than what I'm
used to with Debian variants. Fortunately, I have ample time to work
with it before I shift over from my present system. So if I break it in
my "discovery process", there's no pressure on an immediate fix.
Brian Masinick
2019-07-22 13:21:41 UTC
Permalink
Hi Jim, interesting that you mentioned Debian. I personally think that the two most solid "upstream base distributions" from which to build a fast, efficient and stable system are Slackware and Debian. Interestingly, they are two of the original surviving distributions.

The third one, Red Hat, is also significant, because from it comes some of the finest security and corporate support.

If I work in a large company, I'd want Red Hat Enterprise Linux as a major component of my Enterprise Server Backbone Network.

From a home hobbyist viewpoint, Debian and Slackware belong in a Linux enthusiast "toolbox". A Gentoo variation may be of some educational interest too. Personally I find them overly time consuming. They're great to truly appreciate the infrastructure and design of the system and how to build software, but unless that is your profession, my boss is that the cost of building such a system is "expensive" learning.
Brian Masinick
2019-07-22 13:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Change "boss" to "bias" in the comment above. (I think my phone made a "correction". Unfortunately it's ideas for correction change the context of the comments)!
Brian Masinick
2019-07-22 13:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Boss should be bias.
Jim Sladek
2019-07-22 22:29:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Masinick
I personally think that the two most solid "upstream base distributions" from which to build a fast, efficient and stable system are Slackware and Debian.
I've been pretty much with Debian as near as I can recall for the past
15 years or so. This is my first real venture away from Debian and it's
quite an experience.

New Fundamental Question:

For you, Brian, or anyone else reading this post, I am working with 14.2
current and spent most of the day removing many files (mostly games)
from the system and I will be attempting to install about 25 programs in
an attempt to try and duplicate my present Debian system. I have
already installed PaleMoon browser and Libre Office suite - both work
very nicely.

My question is that when I do upgrades to the system, will all of those
removed files be reinstalled and I would have to go through the rather
tedious removal again? I understand that I can keep those added
third-party files safe from slackpkg manipulations by blacklisting them.

Jim
Brian Masinick
2019-07-23 15:18:41 UTC
Permalink
Jim, the "standard" Slackware package manager doesn't automatically update packages, but if you are installing or manually updating a package it will work similarly to Debian.

There are, however, a few alternative package manager utilities that work for Slackware. If you use one of those you may be able to update software in a manner similar to Debian-based systems.
Jim Sladek
2019-07-23 22:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Masinick
Jim, the "standard" Slackware package manager doesn't automatically update packages,
Yes, I understand that I have to check for updates or set up for an
alert message. And then I manually run the sequence of steps to do the
upgrade process. I wouldn't want an automatic update system anyway -
even in the Debian world, I still check out and initiate/monitor the
update process.

The one thing that I don't have a grasp on is that if I remove a package
- it is removed from the "packages" log and listed in the
"removed_packages" log. Now, if I do a "slackpkg update" followed by a
"slackpkg install-new", is that "new" listing going to include the
removed packages that no longer appear in packages list or does the
process check the "new" against the removed_packages list and only give
you what is really and truly new? It's probably explained in the
documentation somewhere - I just haven't found it yet.

BTW - I was having an interesting time installing my applications of
interest from pkgs.org and noticed on a couple of them that they do list
the dependencies and found it a pretty easy process to check if the
dependencies were installed. Kinda got the hang of that pretty quickly.
Brian Masinick
2019-07-24 16:21:29 UTC
Permalink
Unless the package manager is defective, a list of packages should reflect the system in its current state. Depending on the exact mechanics of each packaging tool, the only exception I can think of is that the package cache has to be in sync with the current state of the system. I would generally expect that to be the case.

Therefore unless I am mistaken (or the cache DOES have to be refreshed) a system package list should match the current package contents.
Brian Masinick
2019-07-24 16:27:24 UTC
Permalink
In your case, you stated that you are doing an update followed by a list.

If this doesn't work correctly that is a defect
Jim Sladek
2019-07-24 22:34:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Masinick
Unless the package manager is defective, a list of packages should reflect the system in its current state. Depending on the exact mechanics of each packaging tool, the only exception I can think of is that the package cache has to be in sync with the current state of the system. I would generally expect that to be the case.
Therefore unless I am mistaken (or the cache DOES have to be refreshed) a system package list should match the current package contents.
There are two key files in /var/log ..... "packages" and
"removed-packages". My guess is that the slackpkg commands act as follows:

update .... this first and key step downloads the master list and
compares it to "packages" and "removed-packages" producing two
sub-lists. List A is comprised of files NOT listed in both "packages"
and "removed-packages". List B is comprised of new versions of files
listed in "packages".

install-new .... this command presents List A for installation.

upgrade-all .... this command presents List B for installation.

clean-system .... this command compares the master list against
"packages" and "blacklist and removes files NOT listed in either
"packages" or "blacklist".

This is the way slackpkg appears to operate to me. The only aspect I am
unsure of is when the installation is first made, and some options are
not used such as XFCE Desktop - how is that handled in the scheme of
things? But, that's a thought for another day.

If what I am surmising is true, then I am quite comfortable with the
notion that some near term update won't reinstall something that I've
removed from my system which was my initial concern. Not sure what
would happen going to say 14.3 or 15.1, but events like that tend to
cause issues in most if not all other distros anyway.
Eef Hartman
2019-07-25 09:13:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Sladek
There are two key files in /var/log ..... "packages" and
"removed-packages".
They have recently been moved, to
/var/lib/pkgtools (for packages and scripts) and
/var/log/pkgtools (for the "removed-" directories
Post by Jim Sladek
The purpose of this update is to migrate the package database and
directories from /var/log to /var/lib/pkgtools.
and
Post by Jim Sladek
The removed_packages and removed_scripts directories are really just
logs that aren't actually used for anything - those will remain under
/var/log, but moved into /var/log/pkgtools.
Note the "aren't actually used for anything" part!
Post by Jim Sladek
update .... this first and key step downloads the master list and
compares it to "packages" and "removed-packages"
It compares with "packages" only. "removed-packages" is like "never
installed packages", they are NOT installed so are targets for a
install-new command. Both the "standard" tools as well as slackpkg go
out from a "full" installation, that is: ALL available packages.
Post by Jim Sladek
List A is comprised of files NOT listed in both "packages"
and "removed-packages".
removed-packages is NOT used for this.
Post by Jim Sladek
List B is comprised of new versions of files listed in "packages".
actually OTHER versions then the installed ones, downgrades sometimes
happen.

So "new" packages are ANY packages that haven't been installed NOW.

In fact you can remove the contents of the "removed-*" directories any
time without the working of slackpkg changing.
Those directories are only temporary used during the "upgrade" or
"remove" process (in fact upgrade is a sequence of "install" (the new
version), remove (the old one) and re-install (to be sure not TOO many
files have been removed) and during that time you temporaly have two
version of the same package installed, so the "old" one is moved to
"removed-packages" (and its install script to "removed-scripts").
For reference they are left there but NEVER used again.
Eric Pozharski
2019-07-25 11:25:56 UTC
Permalink
with <qhame2$r9t$***@dont-email.me> Jim Sladek wrote:

*SKIP*
Post by Jim Sladek
install-new .... this command presents List A for installation.
My reading of slackpkg (and its internals) suggests that 'install-new'
is subjected to filtering through blacklist aspect of slackpkg (let's
not call it f.. fea.. feature). Also what Eef has said.

*CUT*
--
Torvalds' goal for Linux is very simple: World Domination
Stallman's goal for GNU is even simpler: Freedom
Jim Sladek
2019-07-25 18:37:47 UTC
Permalink
With reference to Eef and Eric's comments:

What happens when files are removed? I recently removed perhaps fifty or
more (mainly games) files using the slackpkg 'remove' command. The
comments suggest that they will all be presented again for installation
with the 'install-new' command.

At installation, I was given an option of packages to install and I
de-selected some of them - specifically, KDEI, XFCE and possibly others.

My concern and basic question is - are all of these removed files and
de-selected installation packages going to be presented again someday
when I invoke the sequence of slackpkg commands 'update' followed by
'install-new'? This is what has been suggested.

I ran the 'update' and 'install-new' command sequence a couple of days
after my massive file removals and none of the files I had removed
showed up as a new installation. This seems to indicate that once
removed - always removed.
Eef Hartman
2019-07-26 07:26:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Sladek
What happens when files are removed? I recently removed perhaps fifty or
more (mainly games) files using the slackpkg 'remove' command. The
comments suggest that they will all be presented again for installation
with the 'install-new' command.
At installation, I was given an option of packages to install and I
de-selected some of them - specifically, KDEI, XFCE and possibly others.
You - as far as I know, I never used slackpkg myself - will have to
blacklist them to prevent from them been seen as "new".
But I admit I never traced slackpkg enough to now exactly what it
does, it may just present as "new" the packages which have changed or
updated since the last time you ran it. I know it uses the ChangeLog
and some kinf of date stamps.

I myself only use "installpkg" or "updatepkg" on specific, named
packages from my own mirror of the updates tree. I even haven't got
slackpkg installed at all.

PS: when you use third party packages like alien's multilib or ktown:
it is possible to extend slackpkg with the "slackpkg+" one and then
add those repo's to the repository list OF slackpkg.
I never done that either.
Post by Jim Sladek
My concern and basic question is - are all of these removed files and
de-selected installation packages going to be presented again someday
when I invoke the sequence of slackpkg commands 'update' followed by
'install-new'? This is what has been suggested.
At least _when_ one of those packages has been updated IN the repo it
will be presented again as "new".
Eric Pozharski
2019-07-27 18:26:41 UTC
Permalink
with <qhcsts$p8d$***@dont-email.me> Jim Sladek wrote:
*SKIP*
Post by Jim Sladek
My concern and basic question is - are all of these removed files and
de-selected installation packages going to be presented again someday
when I invoke the sequence of slackpkg commands 'update' followed by
'install-new'? This is what has been suggested.
So, I've managed to go through 'slackpkg install-new' and can confirm my
reading of internals. My purge session was much more significant --
XFCE, KDE etc (and friends too!) are all gone. Now 'install-new'
ignores all of them. But it presents 97 packages for (effectevely)
re-install. I'm not bothering to verify I'm just blindly believing all
of them have been at some point either 'Added.' or 'Renamed.' or such.
Say, I don't see anything KDE related; although I see something that
can be described as XFCE-friends; otherwise I see 'wireless_tools'
(surprise, it was renamed from 'wireless-tools' at 20180409).

Time to blacklist them.

*CUT*
--
Torvalds' goal for Linux is very simple: World Domination
Stallman's goal for GNU is even simpler: Freedom
Jim Sladek
2019-07-28 21:59:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Pozharski
My purge session was much more significant --
XFCE, KDE etc (and friends too!) are all gone. Now 'install-new'
ignores all of them. But it presents 97 packages for (effectevely)
re-install.
Thanks, Eric. I think you have confirmed my idea that I should not be
faced with an install-new of packages that I have removed as a general
rule, though it may occur occasionally. I'll just see how it goes in
the long run.

I think I'll just consider this question closed out at this point.
Eric Pozharski
2019-07-31 12:41:15 UTC
Permalink
with <***@orphan.zombinet> Eric Pozharski wrote:

*SKIP*
Post by Eric Pozharski
So, I've managed to go through 'slackpkg install-new' and can confirm
my reading of internals.
Just to finish this. I can confirm my reading of internals --
install-new is subject to blacklisting.

*CUT*
--
Torvalds' goal for Linux is very simple: World Domination
Stallman's goal for GNU is even simpler: Freedom
Jimmy Johnson
2019-08-02 23:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Sladek
What happens when files are removed? I recently removed perhaps fifty or
more (mainly games) files using the slackpkg 'remove' command.  The
comments suggest that they will all be presented again for installation
with the 'install-new' command.
At installation, I was given an option of packages to install and I
de-selected some of them - specifically, KDEI, XFCE and possibly others.
My concern and basic question is - are all of these removed files and
de-selected installation packages going to be presented again someday
when I invoke the sequence of slackpkg commands 'update' followed by
'install-new'?   This is what has been suggested.
I ran the 'update' and 'install-new' command sequence a couple of days
after my massive file removals and none of the files I had removed
showed up as a new installation.  This seems to indicate that once
removed - always removed.
I know little, but slackpkg repos are added to the cache when you
update, if no longer in the repos it's removed. You are installing and
removing from the cache and those packages will be there regardless if
it's installed or not and will only be removed from cache when no longer
in the repos. Package blacklisting, I know nothing, I'm just careful
when I run clean-system.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware 14.2 - KDE 4.14.32 - EXT4 at sda5
Registered Linux User #380263
Jim Sladek
2019-08-03 14:51:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Johnson
I know little, but slackpkg repos are added to the cache when you
update, if no longer in the repos it's removed. You are installing and
removing from the cache and those packages will be there regardless if
it's installed or not and will only be removed from cache when no longer
in the repos.  Package blacklisting, I know nothing, I'm just careful
when I run clean-system.
There is a lot going on behind the scenes that I don't have a really
good handle on, but it works. And, so far, the apps that I had deleted
have yet to reappear in any updates, so there has to be a part of the
"mechanism" that keeps apps "deleted" when you don't want them. I had
also wondered about the one's that I deselected in setup, but they too
have yet to appear.

Blacklisting works really well. I've tried it and if something is
"blacklisted", then it will not be removed by "remove" which means it's
a good safeguard. I haven't run clean-system lately, but I may make an
image of what I have and test that this weekend to see if things stay
the same or not.

I've also been playing with putting third party apps unzipped as
downloaded from their sites in /opt (PaleMoon, Basilisk & Interlink Mail
& News) and they seem to work okay and are immune from "remove" without
any "blacklisting". This is suggested in part IV of the FAQ, though
they use /usr/local.

Overall, it's an interesting system to work with and may be what I'll
change over to if my present system decides to go bonkers on the next
major update.
L.A. Rathbone
2019-08-25 21:46:33 UTC
Permalink
[snip]
For you, Brian, or anyone else reading this post, I am working with 14.2
current and spent most of the day removing many files (mostly games)
from the system and I will be attempting to install about 25 programs in
an attempt to try and duplicate my present Debian system. I have
already installed PaleMoon browser and Libre Office suite - both work
very nicely.
This is an aside to my main reply to this post, but when I originally
read this, I read it as your having gone through and *manually* deleted
files -- but later when I read on in this thread I saw that you had gone
through and actually removed the packages. I have to admit, I breathed a
little sigh of relief!
My question is that when I do upgrades to the system, will all of those
removed files be reinstalled and I would have to go through the rather
tedious removal again? I understand that I can keep those added
third-party files safe from slackpkg manipulations by blacklisting them.
Jim
It seems like you have pieced together the answer to this question, my
having reviewed the other responses on this thread, but in case someone
else is browing here and looking for the answer, I thought I'd explain
my understanding of how slackpkg works here.

I'll just explain in the context of using stable Slackware releases (eg,
14.2), because it's a bit more complicated when you throw -current into
the mix.

When you run `slackpkg upgrade-all`, it only upgrades packages you
actually have installed. It never pulls in any additional packages,
ever. If you're running a stable release, it tracks the 'patches'
directory on Slackware's FTP server or the applicable mirror thereof, so
you'll basically pull in security and stability updates and nothing
more.

One of the best things about slackpkg is that it makes it very easy to
upgrade from one major release of Slackware to the next.

This serves as a convenient alternative to the traditional methodology
of reading UPGRADE.TXT on the Slackware FTP server and following the
instructions. Which, incidentally, I would try utilizing as an exercise
perhaps the first time you update Slackware, so you can have a good
understanding of first principles. I avoided using slackpkg for years
and have upgraded my distribution several times without a hitch by
following the instructions in UPGRADE.TXT.

Back to slackpkg.... So when Slackware 15.0 comes out, for example, you
would upgrade the distribution as follows, after bumping version numbers
in your config files:

slackpkg update
slackpkg install-new
slackpkg upgrade-all

and optionally:

slackpkg clean-system

'update' just updates the package lists, and should be done pretty much
every time you launch slackpkg.

'install-new' really touches upon what we're talking about here.

It actually goes ahead and parses Slackware's ChangeLog.txt for packages
that have been added to the distribution since the last release (ie, in
this hypothetical, from 14.2 to the upcoming 15.0).

It does not go ahead and re-install packages you have already removed,
because those would NOT count as packages that have been newly added to
the distribution itself.

'upgrade-all', we've already talked about. In this instance it would
upgrade all pre-existing 14.2 packages on your machine to their 15.0
equivalents.

'clean-system', I mentioned is optional. What it does is, it gives you
the option to remove all packages that are not part of the Slackware
distribution. If you have *nothing* but first party packages installed,
this would be quite useful when upgrading from one major release to the
next, as it would basically just remove all packages that have been
removed from the distribution between 14.2 and 15.0 (in this
hypothetical).

Personally I don't care for this functionality as I tend to have many
third party packages on my system. So the only way to make this function
have the intended effect would be to be very smart with your
blacklisting settings.

What I usually do is skip this step, pull up UPGRADE.TXT (remember
that?) and just manually run the `removepkg` command indicated in that
file to remove packages that have been removed from the distribution
since the previous release.

So to answer your question, no! slackpkg is smart enough not to have the
situation you have described occur. This would be undesirable to most
users.

If you *do*, though, want to restore a full Slackware install at any
time, what you would do is run `slackpkg install slackware` which
basically gives you the option to install all packages from the
Slackware distribution as a whole that you do not already have
installed. It will not reinstall packages that are already installed and
up-to-date.

Hope this helps! Happy slacking! :^)
-LARathbone (aka Poprocks)

PS: This is my first newsgroup post in a while. While this group seems
fairly active, you may wish to check out the LinuxQuestions.org
Slackware message board, which is the /de facto/ official support forum
for Slackware:

https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/
Jim Sladek
2019-08-25 22:41:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by L.A. Rathbone
Post by Jim Sladek
My question is that when I do upgrades to the system, will all of those
removed files be reinstalled and I would have to go through the rather
tedious removal again?
It seems like you have pieced together the answer to this question, my
having reviewed the other responses on this thread, but in case someone
else is browing here and looking for the answer, I thought I'd explain
my understanding of how slackpkg works here.
Many thanks for your quite complete description of the slackpkg system.
It was a little frustrating having to kind of reverse engineer the
workings of slackpkg - I could find no documentation that described the
system to my satisfaction. Perhaps it's there, somewhere, but I could
never find it. I appreciate your taking the time to put together your
response and confirm that I was indeed pretty accurate with my own
interpretation. Your writeup will be a good mini-tutorial for others
coming along.

Also thanks for the reminder about LinuxQuestions.org - I have been
there from time to time researching items, though not posting as of yet.

Regards,
Jim
L.A. Rathbone
2019-08-25 23:22:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Sladek
Post by L.A. Rathbone
Post by Jim Sladek
My question is that when I do upgrades to the system, will all of those
removed files be reinstalled and I would have to go through the rather
tedious removal again?
It seems like you have pieced together the answer to this question, my
having reviewed the other responses on this thread, but in case someone
else is browing here and looking for the answer, I thought I'd explain
my understanding of how slackpkg works here.
Many thanks for your quite complete description of the slackpkg system.
It was a little frustrating having to kind of reverse engineer the
workings of slackpkg - I could find no documentation that described the
system to my satisfaction. Perhaps it's there, somewhere, but I could
never find it. I appreciate your taking the time to put together your
response and confirm that I was indeed pretty accurate with my own
interpretation. Your writeup will be a good mini-tutorial for others
coming along.
The slackpkg manpage is fairly thorough - `man slackpkg` and `man
slackpkg.conf` should give you a good summary of slackpkg's features.

There is probably some literature online as well - indeed, there is a
lot of good Slackware literature online, but this distro simply doesn't
have the manpower of a distro like, say, Arch, to pump out the sheer
quantity of quality documentation that would be necessary to adequately
explain everything.

One thing that is interesting about Slackware though is that many of the
tools are written in shell script - and some of the best 'documentation'
is actually embedded in those scripts themselves!

See e.g. /etc/rc.d/rc.S - contrary to a contemporary systemd Linux
system, this script explains, in plain English, through the use of
comments, what is happening every step of the way in the initial boot
process.

Reading these kinds of scripts included with the distro can serve as a
very educational experience.
Post by Jim Sladek
Also thanks for the reminder about LinuxQuestions.org - I have been
there from time to time researching items, though not posting as of yet.
No worries! If I come across you posting at some point, I'll be sure to
say hello.
Jim Sladek
2019-08-25 23:37:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by L.A. Rathbone
One thing that is interesting about Slackware though is that many of the
tools are written in shell script - and some of the best 'documentation'
is actually embedded in those scripts themselves!
See e.g. /etc/rc.d/rc.S - contrary to a contemporary systemd Linux
system, this script explains, in plain English, through the use of
comments, what is happening every step of the way in the initial boot
process.
Reading these kinds of scripts included with the distro can serve as a
very educational experience.
Now that I wasn't aware of. I looked at rc.S and the documenting is
really quite thorough. Thanks for the tip.
Jimmy Johnson
2019-08-28 21:34:11 UTC
Permalink
If you*do*, though, want to restore a full Slackware install at any
time, what you would do is run `slackpkg install slackware` which
basically gives you the option to install all packages from the
Slackware distribution as a whole that you do not already have
installed. It will not reinstall packages that are already installed and
up-to-date.
Do you know how to list all the packages, not just the installed or the
not-installed but all the available slackware packages, I'm thinking
they maybe in someplace named cache, but not sure.

Thanks,
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware 14.2 - KDE 4.14.32 - EXT4 at sda5
Registered Linux User #380263
Rathbone
2019-08-28 23:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Johnson
If you*do*, though, want to restore a full Slackware install at any
time, what you would do is run `slackpkg install slackware` which
basically gives you the option to install all packages from the
Slackware distribution as a whole that you do not already have
installed. It will not reinstall packages that are already installed and
up-to-date.
Do you know how to list all the packages, not just the installed or the
not-installed but all the available slackware packages, I'm thinking
they maybe in someplace named cache, but not sure.
I don't believe slackpkg has a built-in command to accomplish this.

You could find some raw data at /var/lib/slackpkg/pkglist

I looked at the code of slackpkg, and as a side effect of how the search
command works, you could run something like:

slackpkg search ' ' >/tmp/pkgs.txt

to get a list of all packages - it should also show which packages are
installed, which are uninstalled, and which are available for upgrade.

This may not work in future versions of slackpkg though, because it just
so happens to work with the way slackpkg is presently programmed.

Alternatively you could just pull some files from the Slackware ftp
server or a mirror thereof to get this information.
Jimmy Johnson
2019-08-30 04:25:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rathbone
Post by Jimmy Johnson
If you*do*, though, want to restore a full Slackware install at any
time, what you would do is run `slackpkg install slackware` which
basically gives you the option to install all packages from the
Slackware distribution as a whole that you do not already have
installed. It will not reinstall packages that are already installed and
up-to-date.
Do you know how to list all the packages, not just the installed or the
not-installed but all the available slackware packages, I'm thinking
they maybe in someplace named cache, but not sure.
I don't believe slackpkg has a built-in command to accomplish this.
You could find some raw data at /var/lib/slackpkg/pkglist
I looked at the code of slackpkg, and as a side effect of how the search
slackpkg search ' ' >/tmp/pkgs.txt
to get a list of all packages - it should also show which packages are
installed, which are uninstalled, and which are available for upgrade.
I've seen some ls commands with a lot of switches and no explanation of
the switches so I didn't try them. Considering it was ls command it was
probably safe.
Post by Rathbone
This may not work in future versions of slackpkg though, because it just
so happens to work with the way slackpkg is presently programmed.
I'm happy with Slackware 14.2, it just works and I like that.
Post by Rathbone
Alternatively you could just pull some files from the Slackware ftp
server or a mirror thereof to get this information.
Vary true and thanks,
--
Jimmy Johnson

AMD A6-9225 - EXT4 at sda2
Registered Linux User #380263
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