Discussion:
Post install check
(too old to reply)
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 14:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Hello,

Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were some
errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the installation of
the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came and went too fast to read
but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could perhaps have
been something hardware related.

I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.

Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?

Many thanks,
Tuxedo
Giovanni
2018-09-16 15:52:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were
some errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the
installation of the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came
and went too fast to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the
output, so it could perhaps have been something hardware related.
It may be some overheating due to the fact that during the install
process no temperature control is active and exploding xz packages
requires a lot of cpu work. In an old machine (older than 2005), I had
to set max. cooling (full fan speed) under bios control to install a new
release with xz packages.
Post by Tuxedo
I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.
After you restart the system normal temperature controls are active and
Post by Tuxedo
Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?
No, as far I know. Only a record of installed packages and scripts in
available in /var/log/packages/ and /var/log/scripts/

Ciao
Giovanni
--
A computer is like an air conditioner,
it stops working when you open Windows.
< http://giovanni.homelinux.net/ >
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 16:23:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Giovanni
Post by Tuxedo
Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were
some errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the
installation of the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came
and went too fast to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the
output, so it could perhaps have been something hardware related.
It may be some overheating due to the fact that during the install
process no temperature control is active and exploding xz packages
requires a lot of cpu work. In an old machine (older than 2005), I had
to set max. cooling (full fan speed) under bios control to install a new
release with xz packages.
Maybe some package(s) did not install properly in this case.
Post by Giovanni
Post by Tuxedo
I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.
After you restart the system normal temperature controls are active and
Post by Tuxedo
Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?
No, as far I know. Only a record of installed packages and scripts in
available in /var/log/packages/ and /var/log/scripts/
Having a newly installed Slackware 15.0 current release (64 / 4.14.67 #2
SMP), would you recommend running the following?

slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all

Thanks for the info.

Tuxedo
Dan C
2018-09-16 16:32:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
Post by Giovanni
Post by Tuxedo
Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were
some errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the
installation of the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came and
went too fast to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the
output, so it could perhaps have been something hardware related.
It may be some overheating due to the fact that during the install
process no temperature control is active and exploding xz packages
requires a lot of cpu work. In an old machine (older than 2005), I had
to set max. cooling (full fan speed) under bios control to install a
new release with xz packages.
Maybe some package(s) did not install properly in this case.
Post by Giovanni
Post by Tuxedo
I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.
After you restart the system normal temperature controls are active and
Post by Tuxedo
Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?
No, as far I know. Only a record of installed packages and scripts in
available in /var/log/packages/ and /var/log/scripts/
Having a newly installed Slackware 15.0 current release (64 / 4.14.67 #2
SMP), would you recommend running the following?
There is no such thing as "Slackware 15.0 current". What you have
installed is Slackware 14.2-current.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
"Bother!" said Pooh, as he dropped another white rhino.
Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
Thanks, Obama: Loading Image...
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 17:05:40 UTC
Permalink
Dan C wrote:

[...]
Post by Dan C
There is no such thing as "Slackware 15.0 current". What you have
installed is Slackware 14.2-current.
I got a bit confused about it because at first I thought I had indeed
downloaded and installed 14.2-current but the install media created via
Unetbootin included options named "15.0":

Default
huge.s
kms.s
speakup.s
memtest
Slackware 15.0 huge.s kernel
Slackware 15.0 huge.s kernel (use KMS mode)
Detect/boot any installed operatinhg system

Good to know I have 14.2-current and not a more unstable 15.0 beta version.

I presume then 'slackpkg update' and 'slackpkg upgrade-all' will be
compatible with the 14.2-current installation?

Tuxedo
Rich
2018-09-16 17:34:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
[...]
Post by Dan C
There is no such thing as "Slackware 15.0 current". What you have
installed is Slackware 14.2-current.
I got a bit confused about it because at first I thought I had indeed
downloaded and installed 14.2-current but the install media created via
As Dan C indicated, there is no "15.0-current" nor is there a
"14.2-current" as Dan C implied.

There is:

Slackare 14.2
Slackware current

"current" is the full name, it does not have a "version code number".
Ignore whatever you might see inside as labels, as those are merely
works in progress. It is the bleeding edge that changes as things move
towards the next release version. It is also the one that may,
sometimes, break, because of those bleeding edge changes.
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 19:56:31 UTC
Permalink
Rich wrote:

[...]
Post by Rich
As Dan C indicated, there is no "15.0-current" nor is there a
"14.2-current" as Dan C implied.
Slackare 14.2
Slackware current
"current" is the full name, it does not have a "version code number".
Ignore whatever you might see inside as labels, as those are merely
works in progress. It is the bleeding edge that changes as things move
towards the next release version. It is also the one that may,
sometimes, break, because of those bleeding edge changes.
I'm still pondering what to do with 'slackpkg update' and 'spackpkg upgrade-
all'. I guess most things on the system is up-to-date for now since it was
installed from a very recent 'current' download.

The first step is of course to uncomment a mirror in /etc/slackpkg/mirrors
and I see that I can pick one of the 'ftp.../slackware64-current/' mirrors
instead of the 14.2.

On previous 14.x versions I had to install Wicd only to get wireless working
easily, while the integrated networking applet in the taskbar works just
great! Other things on this new system seem to work very well too. I think
the bleeding edge version is best suited for the hardware I installed it on.

Tuxedo
Jimmy Johnson
2018-09-17 03:58:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich
Post by Tuxedo
[...]
Post by Dan C
There is no such thing as "Slackware 15.0 current". What you have
installed is Slackware 14.2-current.
I got a bit confused about it because at first I thought I had indeed
downloaded and installed 14.2-current but the install media created via
As Dan C indicated, there is no "15.0-current" nor is there a
"14.2-current" as Dan C implied.
Hi Rich, I've been reading and waiting for someone to get it right.
Post by Rich
Slackare 14.2
Slackware current
"current" is the full name, it does not have a "version code number".
Ignore whatever you might see inside as labels, as those are merely
works in progress. It is the bleeding edge that changes as things move
towards the next release version. It is also the one that may,
sometimes, break, because of those bleeding edge changes.
If you install or upgrade to "CURRENT" you are testing software on your
computer, it may or may not be stable.

Slackpkg What's nice about slackpkg is upgrade or downgrade to
different versions of Slackware they get treated the same, it's a
package change and maybe a config change, anything else 'slackpkg
clean-all. I found a nice thread on the subject.

https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/installpkg-and-slackpkg-install-4175427552/
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 14.2 - Just Say No! To SystemD, Plasma5 & Drugs!
KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
Ferannia
2018-09-16 19:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
Good to know I have 14.2-current and not a more unstable 15.0 beta version.
Beta or no beta there is no Slackware 15.0. What you have installed
(current) is what other linux distros use to call testing.
Ars Ivci
2018-09-16 17:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
Hello,
Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were some
errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the installation of
the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came and went too fast to read
but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could perhaps have
been something hardware related.
I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.
Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?
Many thanks,
Tuxedo
It is possible that the program dmesg has logged any hardware related
issues. You can run something like "dmesg | grep overheating" without
the quotes as root.
t.
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 17:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Ars Ivci wrote:

[...]
Post by Ars Ivci
It is possible that the program dmesg has logged any hardware related
issues. You can run something like "dmesg | grep overheating" without
the quotes as root.
t.
Thanks for this tip!

Tuxedo
Ars Ivci
2018-09-16 17:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
[...]
Post by Ars Ivci
It is possible that the program dmesg has logged any hardware related
issues. You can run something like "dmesg | grep overheating" without
the quotes as root.
t.
Thanks for this tip!
Tuxedo
You can also run sensors in a terminal. It will show CPU temperatures.

t.
Tuxedo
2018-09-16 19:28:34 UTC
Permalink
Ars Ivci wrote:

[...]
Post by Ars Ivci
It is possible that the program dmesg has logged any hardware related
issues. You can run something like "dmesg | grep overheating" without
the quotes as root.
t.
No overheating had been detected in that logfile :-)

Tuxedo
Zaphod Beeblebrox
2018-09-16 18:33:37 UTC
Permalink
to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could
perhaps have been something hardware related.
When was the last time this box got some maintenance?
Every computer should (on a breezy day) be taken out to the porch,
opened, and (gently) have the dust blown out of it. Also remove
any dead rodents.

If a smoker used this computer, write it off and junk it.
The Real Bev
2018-09-16 20:13:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could
perhaps have been something hardware related.
When was the last time this box got some maintenance?
Every computer should (on a breezy day) be taken out to the porch,
opened, and (gently) have the dust blown out of it.
A 2HP compressor will do the trick nicely!
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
Also remove any dead rodents.
You think this is a joke. We got my mom (actually, we forced it on her
against her will) her first microwave oven at a yard sale. She loved
it. Several years later it stopped working. When hubby took it apart
he found a dessicated mouse inside, in a place where it must have gotten
in during assembly. Hubby removed the mouse and tightened up some
connections and it worked fine from then on. To my mom's credit, she
continued to use the oven until her boss gave her a smaller more
powerful one for Xmas.
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
If a smoker used this computer, write it off and junk it.
Nonsense. The smoke creates a layer of protection against excessive
oxygen, which could cause corrosion or start a fire.
--
Cheers, Bev
Little Mary took her skis upon the snow to frisk.
Wasn't she a silly girl her little * ?
DanCa
2018-09-16 23:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it
could perhaps have been something hardware related.
When was the last time this box got some maintenance?
Every computer should (on a breezy day) be taken out to the porch,
opened, and (gently) have the dust blown out of it.
A 2HP compressor will do the trick nicely!
It was explicitly discouraged. A compressor could have pushed dust
*under* the integrated circuits, where gravity would have never been able
to put it, creating unexpected false contacts or altering condenser's
capacity. I mean, in cities dust can be kind of "metallic". That was
anyway the story they told me. Good old times.
However, I still prefere the "gently removal".
Post by The Real Bev
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
Also remove any dead rodents.
I found one in a Mannesmann printer once. The client came to me,
outraged, with that smelling printer, and was never really convinced the
mouse was coming from his basement, and thought that I was selling
printers with mouse 10 years before it was invented. I have never seen
him after, despite my removal of the critter -for free! I should have
asked money for that, he surely misinterpreted my kindness for an
admission of guilt, pfft.

Dan
--
No suggestions, please. I can do wrong by myself.
The Real Bev
2018-09-17 03:42:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by DanCa
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
Also remove any dead rodents.
I found one in a Mannesmann printer once. The client came to me,
outraged, with that smelling printer, and was never really convinced the
mouse was coming from his basement, and thought that I was selling
printers with mouse 10 years before it was invented. I have never seen
him after, despite my removal of the critter -for free! I should have
asked money for that, he surely misinterpreted my kindness for an
admission of guilt, pfft.
You're clearly off the hook. A dead rodent will stink for 3 or 4 weeks
-- I couldn't get to the place where it died to determine if it was a
rat or mouse. I learned to hate Glade as much as rotting rodent.

Then came the big lazy stupid flies...
--
Cheers, Bev
"So I'm at the wailing wall, standing there like a moron,
with my harpoon." -- Emo Philips
NotReal
2018-09-18 00:43:35 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by DanCa
Post by The Real Bev
A 2HP compressor will do the trick nicely!
It was explicitly discouraged. A compressor could have pushed dust
under the integrated circuits, where gravity would have never been
able to put it, creating unexpected false contacts or altering
condenser's capacity. I mean, in cities dust can be kind of
"metallic". That was anyway the story they told me. Good old times.
However, I still prefere the "gently removal".
I have used a shop compressor @125 PSI with a water separator in the
line since 8088 days to clean out the dust bunnies etc. and never had a
problem after the first time. The first time I did not know enough to
prevent the fans from spinning and I apparently over reved one of them.
At least I assumed that was the problem as it was sure noisy after the
cleaning. Now I either keep each fan from spinning with a finger as
the air passes by or, as in the case of a PS fan, stick a small screw
driver through the grille to keep it from spinning. YMMV
Rich
2018-09-18 01:25:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by NotReal
snip
Post by DanCa
Post by The Real Bev
A 2HP compressor will do the trick nicely!
It was explicitly discouraged. A compressor could have pushed dust
under the integrated circuits, where gravity would have never been
able to put it, creating unexpected false contacts or altering
condenser's capacity. I mean, in cities dust can be kind of
"metallic". That was anyway the story they told me. Good old
times. However, I still prefere the "gently removal".
line since 8088 days to clean out the dust bunnies etc. and never had a
problem after the first time. The first time I did not know enough to
prevent the fans from spinning and I apparently over reved one of them.
At least I assumed that was the problem as it was sure noisy after the
cleaning. Now I either keep each fan from spinning with a finger as
the air passes by or, as in the case of a PS fan, stick a small screw
driver through the grille to keep it from spinning. YMMV
There's another reason to not spin up the fans with high pressure air.
Most PC fan motors are permanent magnet motors, so when spun by an
outside source of energy they become generators.

If the fan drive circuits to which the fan is connected can't tolerate
the generated voltages, one can burn them out, resulting in no power
for the fan afterwards.

Jimmy Johnson
2018-09-17 02:15:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
to read but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could
perhaps have been something hardware related.
When was the last time this box got some maintenance?
Every computer should (on a breezy day) be taken out to the porch,
opened, and (gently) have the dust blown out of it. Also remove
any dead rodents.
Not to mention playing cards and Popsicle sticks, I've seen them.
Post by Zaphod Beeblebrox
If a smoker used this computer, write it off and junk it.
Vacuum, cover any metal ends of the hose with tape, don't for get to
vacuum the PCI slots.

Pencel eraser, take a look at those PCI cards they may need a little
rubbing.

An old toothbrush dabbed in alcohol can clean fan blades and is handy in
a lot of other places too, don't forget to remove the power supply, take
it apart and clean it too. I clean fans and power supply outside, things
get a little messy before they get polished, lubed and looking new again.

A flat razor blade and some new goop/thermal-paste for the CPU.

Fans need to be clean and dry before you lube them, use a lite machine
oil like sewing machine oil or what I use comes from a motorcycle shop,
it's silicon chain lube and comes in a spray can, a drop of oil from the
dip stick in your car will work too. Do not use WD40 or others like it,
they are a cleaner and dryer and your parts will quickly wear out
without the lube.

CD/DVD heads can be cleaned with electronic cleaner in a can, normal
cotton swabs leave cotton bits so use video cleaning swabs and or video
cleaning pads to polish the video head.

All kinds of brushes can be handy, just remember use no wire/metal heads.

Questions?
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 14.2 - Just Say No! To SystemD, Plasma5 & Drugs!
KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
Jimmy Johnson
2018-09-17 04:18:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
Hello,
Having recently done a current Slackware 15 installation there were some
errors flashing by the screen while setup was running the installation of
the full 9+GB package of software. The errors came and went too fast to read
but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could perhaps have
been something hardware related.
I did not re-run the installation as everything seems to work fine.
Hopefully the errors were just warnings.
Are logs of the Slackware install process saved somewhere on the system?
Many thanks,
Tuxedo
I'm still learning, what I've learned is changing a few config files and
learning a few commands you can upgrade and downgrade just for the fun
and keep your system clean, just like new.

What I have not learned is installing packages that have not been built
yet. And I have to use source and maybe source profile is .deb or .rpm
and a easy way to satisfy depends, these things take work.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 14.2 - Just Say No! To SystemD, Plasma5 & Drugs!
KDE 4.14.32 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda9
Registered Linux User #380263
root
2018-09-17 14:57:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Johnson
What I have not learned is installing packages that have not been built
yet. And I have to use source and maybe source profile is .deb or .rpm
and a easy way to satisfy depends, these things take work.
You can use .deb or .rpm packages by converting them using
deb2tgz or rpm2tgz.

While we are on the subject of slackpkg you should also
install and learn about slpkg. There are several package
repositories which offer prebuilt packages that are
not part of the standard Slackware offerings. Notable
among these repositories are slackbuilds and slonly.
With slackbuilds you compile packages on your machine
and handle the dependencies.

slonly, for one, offers compiled packages along with
handling the dependencies.

Dependencies refers to the fact that some packages
require others, and those packages may then require
other packages. It can become a nightmare and you
can easily spend an afternoon before you get something
functional. ffmpeg is an example of such a nightmare.

If you decide to look into slpkg be sure to update
the repository before searching. Things change
and what worked a few weeks ago may not work now.
Tuxedo
2018-09-17 22:01:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by root
Post by Jimmy Johnson
What I have not learned is installing packages that have not been built
yet. And I have to use source and maybe source profile is .deb or .rpm
and a easy way to satisfy depends, these things take work.
You can use .deb or .rpm packages by converting them using
deb2tgz or rpm2tgz.
Good to know, since there are always the must-have proprietary apps whose
designers are concerned with creating maintream distro packages only.
Post by root
While we are on the subject of slackpkg you should also
install and learn about slpkg. There are several package
repositories which offer prebuilt packages that are
not part of the standard Slackware offerings. Notable
among these repositories are slackbuilds and slonly.
With slackbuilds you compile packages on your machine
and handle the dependencies.
slonly, for one, offers compiled packages along with
handling the dependencies.
Dependencies refers to the fact that some packages
require others, and those packages may then require
other packages. It can become a nightmare and you
can easily spend an afternoon before you get something
functional. ffmpeg is an example of such a nightmare.
I remember having had issues with ffmpeg but can't remember if I got it
running before. I also plan to install Avidemux and Kdenlive on the current
system, whenever I have some spare hours or even days....
Post by root
If you decide to look into slpkg be sure to update
the repository before searching. Things change
and what worked a few weeks ago may not work now.
marco
2018-09-17 07:09:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tuxedo
but I noticed the word "overheating" in the output, so it could perhaps have
been something hardware related.
Many years ago I had a machine wich died in the middle of the installation due
to overheating.
Since then, when I boot from the slackware CD, at the point where it asks which
kernel to boot, in the very first prompt after boot, I type

huge.s ACPI=OFF

I'm not sure wether it's still necessary, but since then the cooling fans have
taken care of themselves on every install.

Bye, Marco
--
$ echo -n bWFyY29AcHJlZGljYXRvcmkuaXQK | base64 -d
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