Discussion:
Upgrading to Current
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root
2020-04-21 14:58:00 UTC
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I am still running 14.2 and I am wary about upgrading to current
because of unpleasant results from a prior attempt. I just tried
to install the brave-browser from Slackbuilds and it will not
run because my nss(?) is too old. Brave requires nss new than 3.26.

Although I haven't checked, I suppose that current version of nss
would suffice.

If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
Rich
2020-04-21 15:09:15 UTC
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Post by root
I am still running 14.2 and I am wary about upgrading to current
because of unpleasant results from a prior attempt. I just tried
to install the brave-browser from Slackbuilds and it will not
run because my nss(?) is too old. Brave requires nss new than 3.26.
Although I haven't checked, I suppose that current version of nss
would suffice.
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?

You could download the NSS source package and build script, build it,
install it, and see what happens.

If things go south, then just reinstall 14.2's NSS and you are back
where you started (note, grab a copy ahead of time if you want to be
'real' careful and you don't have a 14.2 DVD to use).

If everything works, then just stick with that.
root
2020-04-21 15:36:22 UTC
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Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
You could download the NSS source package and build script, build it,
install it, and see what happens.
If things go south, then just reinstall 14.2's NSS and you are back
where you started (note, grab a copy ahead of time if you want to be
'real' careful and you don't have a 14.2 DVD to use).
If everything works, then just stick with that.
I looked for something like libnss, or nss by itself and couldn't
find anything in the source for current. I suspect that nss may
reside in openssh or openssl and I have had troubles trying to
update only those two in the past.

Thanks for responding Rich.
Chris Vine
2020-04-21 15:43:53 UTC
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On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 15:36:22 +0000 (UTC)
Post by root
I looked for something like libnss, or nss by itself and couldn't
find anything in the source for current. I suspect that nss may
reside in openssh or openssl and I have had troubles trying to
update only those two in the past.
You are probably looking for the mozilla-nss package, which currently
comes with nspr-4.25 and nss-3.51.1.
root
2020-04-21 16:08:33 UTC
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Post by Chris Vine
On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 15:36:22 +0000 (UTC)
Post by root
I looked for something like libnss, or nss by itself and couldn't
find anything in the source for current. I suspect that nss may
reside in openssh or openssl and I have had troubles trying to
update only those two in the past.
You are probably looking for the mozilla-nss package, which currently
comes with nspr-4.25 and nss-3.51.1.
I'm going to give up on brave. I see too much risk for my 14.2 to
try installing foreign things.

Thanks for responding.
Henrik Carlqvist
2020-04-21 17:45:29 UTC
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Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
...
Post by Rich
I'm going to give up on brave. I see too much risk for my 14.2 to try
installing foreign things.
No need to do that. All you need to do is to make sure that you have an
up-to-date Slackware 14.2 by installing the security patches from
ftp://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/slackware/slackware64-14.2/patches/packages/

Those patches include:

mozilla-firefox-68.7.0esr-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz

From the changelog:

+--------------------------+
Mon Dec 3 20:59:30 UTC 2018
patches/packages/mozilla-nss-3.40.1-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz: Upgraded.
Upgraded to nss-3.40.1 and nspr-4.20.
Mitigate cache side-channel variant of the Bleichenbacher attack.
For more information, see:
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2018-12404
(* Security fix *)
+--------------------------+

As you will see in the changelog at
http://www.slackware.com/changelog/stable.php?cpu=x86_64
there are some other packages that might be worth upgrading as well.

regards Henrik
Chris Vine
2020-04-21 17:57:59 UTC
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On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 17:45:29 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
...
Post by Rich
I'm going to give up on brave. I see too much risk for my 14.2 to try
installing foreign things.
No need to do that. All you need to do is to make sure that you have an
up-to-date Slackware 14.2 by installing the security patches from
ftp://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/slackware/slackware64-14.2/patches/packages/
mozilla-firefox-68.7.0esr-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz
A slip of the keyboard. The mozilla-firefox package doesn't provide
libnss3 for anything other than firefox, which it puts
in /usr/lib64/firefox. He needs the mozilla-nss package, as you
indicate below, for other applications which want to link to libnss3,
which puts it in /usr/lib64.
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
+--------------------------+
Mon Dec 3 20:59:30 UTC 2018
patches/packages/mozilla-nss-3.40.1-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz: Upgraded.
Upgraded to nss-3.40.1 and nspr-4.20.
Mitigate cache side-channel variant of the Bleichenbacher attack.
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2018-12404
(* Security fix *)
+--------------------------+
root
2020-04-21 19:22:20 UTC
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Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
...
No need to do that. All you need to do is to make sure that you have an
up-to-date Slackware 14.2 by installing the security patches from
ftp://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/slackware/slackware64-14.2/patches/packages/
mozilla-firefox-68.7.0esr-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz
+--------------------------+
Mon Dec 3 20:59:30 UTC 2018
patches/packages/mozilla-nss-3.40.1-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz: Upgraded.
Upgraded to nss-3.40.1 and nspr-4.20.
Mitigate cache side-channel variant of the Bleichenbacher attack.
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2018-12404
(* Security fix *)
+--------------------------+
As you will see in the changelog at
http://www.slackware.com/changelog/stable.php?cpu=x86_64
there are some other packages that might be worth upgrading as well.
Thanks for responding Henrik

I know the procedure(s) to upgrade from on version to another as
well as how to use slackpkg to update to current. Is there
a corresponding slackpkg sequence to upgrade just the 14.2
security patches?
root
2020-04-21 19:37:08 UTC
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Post by root
Post by Henrik Carlqvist
Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
...
No need to do that. All you need to do is to make sure that you have an
up-to-date Slackware 14.2 by installing the security patches from
ftp://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/slackware/slackware64-14.2/patches/packages/
mozilla-firefox-68.7.0esr-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz
+--------------------------+
Mon Dec 3 20:59:30 UTC 2018
patches/packages/mozilla-nss-3.40.1-x86_64-1_slack14.2.txz: Upgraded.
Upgraded to nss-3.40.1 and nspr-4.20.
Mitigate cache side-channel variant of the Bleichenbacher attack.
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2018-12404
(* Security fix *)
+--------------------------+
As you will see in the changelog at
http://www.slackware.com/changelog/stable.php?cpu=x86_64
there are some other packages that might be worth upgrading as well.
Thanks for responding Henrik
I know the procedure(s) to upgrade from on version to another as
well as how to use slackpkg to update to current. Is there
a corresponding slackpkg sequence to upgrade just the 14.2
security patches?
Well I found the command is simply:

slackpkg upgrade patches

Which I just said go for it. It is still running so I am ashamed
to admit I have never upgraded my 14.2 since the initial
installation.
root
2020-04-21 19:16:00 UTC
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Post by root
I'm going to give up on brave. I see too much risk for my 14.2 to
try installing foreign things.
I upgraded to current on a spare partition and brave runs without
a problem.
Jimmy Johnson
2020-04-24 07:16:46 UTC
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Post by root
Post by root
I'm going to give up on brave. I see too much risk for my 14.2 to
try installing foreign things.
I upgraded to current on a spare partition and brave runs without
a problem.
Good and I hope my other post helps you feel more comfortable while
using current.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 Current - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda5
Registered Linux User #380263
Eef Hartman
2020-04-21 16:23:24 UTC
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Post by root
I looked for something like libnss, or nss by itself and couldn't
find anything in the source for current. I suspect that nss may
The sources for nss reside in
archive.mozilla.org/pub/security/nss/releases/
and the latest version is 3.51.1, so much newer then 3.26

You can get those sources with or without nspr:
nss-3.51.1-with-nspr-4.25.tar.gz 76M 08-Apr-2020 15:13
nss-3.51.1.tar.gz 74M 08-Apr-2020 15:13
The slackware package in -current is _with_.

I never tried to compile them in Slackware 14.2, though.
Rich
2020-04-21 16:49:22 UTC
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Post by root
Post by Rich
Is Slack-current's NSS 3.26 or greater?
You could download the NSS source package and build script, build it,
install it, and see what happens.
If things go south, then just reinstall 14.2's NSS and you are back
where you started (note, grab a copy ahead of time if you want to be
'real' careful and you don't have a 14.2 DVD to use).
If everything works, then just stick with that.
I looked for something like libnss, or nss by itself and couldn't
find anything in the source for current. I suspect that nss may
reside in openssh or openssl and I have had troubles trying to
update only those two in the past.
Thanks for responding Rich.
grep libnss /var/log/packages/*

Shows that it is in glibc, which while you can recompile and upgrade
glibc if you want, that is quite an endeavor that will take some time
to complete.
Johann 'Myrkraverk' Oskarsson
2020-04-22 16:50:11 UTC
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Post by Rich
grep libnss /var/log/packages/*
Shows that it is in glibc, which while you can recompile and upgrade
glibc if you want, that is quite an endeavor that will take some time
to complete.
That's a different nss I believe. This would be the Name Service Switch
while the OP was looking for Mozilla's Netscape Security Services: NSS.
--
Johann | email: invalid -> com | www.myrkraverk.com/blog/
I'm not from the Internet, I just work there. | twitter: @myrkraverk
Jimmy Johnson
2020-04-24 07:14:48 UTC
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Post by root
I am still running 14.2 and I am wary about upgrading to current
because of unpleasant results from a prior attempt. I just tried
to install the brave-browser from Slackbuilds and it will not
run because my nss(?) is too old. Brave requires nss new than 3.26.
Although I haven't checked, I suppose that current version of nss
would suffice.
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
I think one of the best things about slackware is how fast problems get
fixed.

Upgrading is not hard to do, I guess you know to change
/etc/slackpkg/mirrors and 'slackpkg update gpg' and 'slackpkg update'
and 'slackpkg install-new' and 'slackpkg upgrade-all' and 'slackpkg
clean-system'?

The above keep me running without problem on all my slackware systems.

I run 14.1, 14.2, current and kde5. With kde5 I also run 'slackpkg
install ktown', it's the ktown kde5 version of install-new, I run both
with kde5. I test many other linux systems too and slackware is the most
time tested, stable, less intrusive linux system there is and I heart
slackware, it's installed on 7 different laptops from one core 32bit to
ddr4 multi core 64bit and this one my main desktop computer with 10 cores.
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 Current - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda5
Registered Linux User #380263
m***@bil.myplace.org
2020-05-06 14:22:43 UTC
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Post by root
I am still running 14.2 and I am wary about upgrading to current
because of unpleasant results from a prior attempt. I just tried
to install the brave-browser from Slackbuilds and it will not
run because my nss(?) is too old. Brave requires nss new than 3.26.
Although I haven't checked, I suppose that current version of nss
would suffice.
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
I did a complete install of current about a week ago. So far I am
finding it very good. Everything works - wifi, printing, scanning,
video capture with webcam, firefox, waterfox. This was on two systems,
a desktop pc and an old thinkpad. Seems completely stable. Most of the
time I run windowmaker but I use kde plasma for some things and that all
seems to work too. I was running ubuntu previously, but wiped that and
went back to slack.
root
2020-05-06 14:29:17 UTC
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Post by m***@bil.myplace.org
I did a complete install of current about a week ago. So far I am
finding it very good. Everything works - wifi, printing, scanning,
video capture with webcam, firefox, waterfox. This was on two systems,
a desktop pc and an old thinkpad. Seems completely stable. Most of the
time I run windowmaker but I use kde plasma for some things and that all
seems to work too. I was running ubuntu previously, but wiped that and
went back to slack.
Thanks for responding. I decided, for now, to stick with 14.2 and
just upgrade my system via patches. After your upgrade what does
your /etc/slackware-version show?
Jimmy Johnson
2020-05-06 21:16:51 UTC
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Post by root
Thanks for responding. I decided, for now, to stick with 14.2 and
just upgrade my system via patches. After your upgrade what does
your /etc/slackware-version show?
It's 14.2+ for both current and or kde5.

good luck,
--
Jimmy Johnson

Slackware64 14.2 - KDE 4.14.38 - AMD A8-7600 - EXT4 at sda5
Registered Linux User #380263
m***@bil.myplace.org
2020-05-13 20:03:37 UTC
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Post by root
Post by m***@bil.myplace.org
I did a complete install of current about a week ago. So far I am
finding it very good. Everything works - wifi, printing, scanning,
video capture with webcam, firefox, waterfox. This was on two systems,
a desktop pc and an old thinkpad. Seems completely stable. Most of the
time I run windowmaker but I use kde plasma for some things and that all
seems to work too. I was running ubuntu previously, but wiped that and
went back to slack.
Thanks for responding. I decided, for now, to stick with 14.2 and
just upgrade my system via patches. After your upgrade what does
your /etc/slackware-version show?
***@bil:~$ cat /etc/slackware-version
Slackware 14.2+

and uname -a says

$ Linux bil.myplace.org 5.4.35 #1 SMP Thu Apr 23 13:47:56 CDT 2020 x86_64
m***@bil.myplace.org
2020-05-13 20:28:19 UTC
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Post by root
Post by m***@bil.myplace.org
I did a complete install of current about a week ago. So far I am
finding it very good. Everything works - wifi, printing, scanning,
video capture with webcam, firefox, waterfox. This was on two systems,
a desktop pc and an old thinkpad. Seems completely stable. Most of the
time I run windowmaker but I use kde plasma for some things and that all
seems to work too. I was running ubuntu previously, but wiped that and
went back to slack.
Thanks for responding. I decided, for now, to stick with 14.2 and
just upgrade my system via patches. After your upgrade what does
your /etc/slackware-version show?
A few more notes.. mplayer, mpv and vlc all work (the latter two built
from slackbuilds). Moc works. Vlc streaming play of youtube videos works.
I didn't bother installing the kde4 that is shipped with current,
but instead installed Alien Bob's latest ktown packages to get
kde plasma 5, which is very nice if you prefer a modern desktop
environment. If you're old school like me, fvwm still works :-)
Xephyr works for nested X sessions.

I can mount my camera's sdram card to copy photos off. Laptop suspend
and resume works (I had to set up an acpi hook to make it activate on
lid close). All the usual office software works. Wifi is nice and stable,
I have an old intel wifi card in the thinkpad, nice to see that working.
Using network manager failover from wifi to cable is still a bit slow,
this is one area where freebsd is superior using link aggregation,
maybe there is a way to define a lagg device in linux but I haven't
found it yet.

As you can tell this is a desktop system, not a server, so I can't
really say much about server usage. But as a desktop it's very nice.
I managed to get google hangouts video conferencing working (running
inside firefox) using an old HP webcam I had lying around, chatting to a
couple of friends, three video streasms with acceptable performance.
All on ten-year-old hardware.

Congrats to the slackware team for producing a good build!

If you've got a spare pc lying around do give it a try, I think you'll
be pleasantly surprised :-)
root
2020-05-13 21:55:41 UTC
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Post by m***@bil.myplace.org
A few more notes.. mplayer, mpv and vlc all work (the latter two built
from slackbuilds). Moc works. Vlc streaming play of youtube videos works.
I didn't bother installing the kde4 that is shipped with current,
but instead installed Alien Bob's latest ktown packages to get
kde plasma 5, which is very nice if you prefer a modern desktop
environment. If you're old school like me, fvwm still works :-)
Xephyr works for nested X sessions.
I can mount my camera's sdram card to copy photos off. Laptop suspend
and resume works (I had to set up an acpi hook to make it activate on
lid close). All the usual office software works. Wifi is nice and stable,
I have an old intel wifi card in the thinkpad, nice to see that working.
Using network manager failover from wifi to cable is still a bit slow,
this is one area where freebsd is superior using link aggregation,
maybe there is a way to define a lagg device in linux but I haven't
found it yet.
As you can tell this is a desktop system, not a server, so I can't
really say much about server usage. But as a desktop it's very nice.
I managed to get google hangouts video conferencing working (running
inside firefox) using an old HP webcam I had lying around, chatting to a
couple of friends, three video streasms with acceptable performance.
All on ten-year-old hardware.
Congrats to the slackware team for producing a good build!
If you've got a spare pc lying around do give it a try, I think you'll
be pleasantly surprised :-)
Thanks for responding. I have lots of spare partions and machines so
I will give current a shot. As far as window managers I'm pretty
insensitive to features. I ran fvwm-95 way past the point where it
was not supported, then switched to fvwm2 because I could make it
look like -95, now I am running fluxbox on my AV server.
Eef Hartman
2020-05-06 23:25:59 UTC
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Post by root
Brave requires nss new than 3.26.
The latest upgrade for mozilla-nss in 14.2 is version 3.40.1, released
in dec 2018
So if you update your system with the packages from the
"patches/packages" directory for either version (32- or 64-bit) of
Slackware 14.2 on any slackware mirror, you'll get that newer version,
without having to go the -current way.
David Chmelik
2020-05-21 07:08:00 UTC
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Permalink
I am still running 14.2 and I am wary about upgrading to current because
of unpleasant results from a prior attempt. I just tried to install the
brave-browser from Slackbuilds and it will not run because my nss(?) is
too old. Brave requires nss new than 3.26.
Although I haven't checked, I suppose that current version of nss would
suffice.
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
After upgrading to current in '00s I had problems, and do recently.
Things seem better now, mostly from more experience, but also Slackware
team grew and updates better/faster/ On the other hand, there are always
new things one has to get experience with next. In '00s there many not
have been any GPUs, at least multi-core. Now there are, and some of the
drivers are tens of millions of lines of KB of code, even though Free/
Libre/Opensource Software (F/LS, OSS, FOSS, FLOSS.) I was told that's
what might be preventing some X/KDE programs (some audio/video players)
running, but also seems like with these drivers I have to compile for
every kernel, then update for that kernel.

Mplayer (and various interfaces to it like KMPlayer) is a nice, simple
option, but there are increasingly-many alternatives you might consider
from SlackBuilds.org (SBo) without having to upgrade to current.

I'm dual-booting FreeBSD-current Unix, and while I consider Unix to be
the most clean/stable (designed ahead of time) code (GNU/Linux
historically not much, rather than making it up as they go along, mixing
in locally-installed files with system files, which you don't see happen
on Unix,) it appears LILO might be a safer boot-loader in ways than
FreeBSD's (BTX?) boot-loader(?,) though that might be more powerful.
After I thought Slackware-current's latest Linux kernel had a problem
(actually I botched the update) it seemed only LILO would boot both
anymore (new and old Linux kernels... BTX might need more reinstallation
to recognize updates) I tried to switch to LILO. I lost my partitions (I
have backups!) Now I don't really think that's a Slackware-current
problem, as LILO is old, but might be a FreeBSD-current problem, as they
had some such in the past... FreeBSD 12.0 didn't boot unless you
installed boot-loader from 11.2 or used something else (LILO) as I and
several/many others found/reported.

But anyway, a main problem is kernel updates can be difficult and
sometimes don't go well especially if one update regularly even at night
when tired. Documentation says don't upgrade running kernel... well, you
can, but it's risky. It wasn't the kernel's fault this time rather than
configuration. However I'm not sure slackpkg yet gives a way to keep
your current kernel *and* download a new one to install alongside then
add to /etc/lilo.conf. So I was lazy and paid for it.

Such a problem with Slackware-current is it's regularly (sometimes daily/
weekly) installing kernel updates. One might think a problem has to do
with drivers compiled for some kernel (as I did) and be quick to upgrade
to new kernels... and be tempted to. For that and other reasons (less
experience with FreeBSD since 1990s, just OpenBSD, and how they work with
Slackware) earlier this month I did maybe 20 reinstalls/week. Sometimes
it's trying other current things, but sometimes it's just one doesn't
feel like taking all the time to use current more safely (and can take
much time, like I'm updating maybe 500 or 1000+ SBo builds) then stuff
happens.

They say don't use Slackware-current on a 'production system,' but
sometimes people don't feel they have much choice. Some have good
results; often I didn't because I do too much. It's up to you. You
could try in the future if might help MPlayer or something, but sometimes
you'll end up wasting more time than if you consider several similar
alternatives on SBo for Slackware-stable. I get good maybe 50% good
results installing a minimal amount of current packages on stable, but if
they have dependencies, they're more likely to break system. If not,
they maybe 50% work, 50% not or break system, but easy enough to roll
back (if you have an .ISO mounted and/or patches saved...)
root
2020-05-21 07:19:17 UTC
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Post by David Chmelik
They say don't use Slackware-current on a 'production system,' but
sometimes people don't feel they have much choice. Some have good
results; often I didn't because I do too much. It's up to you. You
could try in the future if might help MPlayer or something, but sometimes
you'll end up wasting more time than if you consider several similar
alternatives on SBo for Slackware-stable. I get good maybe 50% good
results installing a minimal amount of current packages on stable, but if
they have dependencies, they're more likely to break system. If not,
they maybe 50% work, 50% not or break system, but easy enough to roll
back (if you have an .ISO mounted and/or patches saved...)
Thanks for responding. I decided to stick with 14.2 after applying
all the patches. As far as mplayer goes, I was persuaded to give
mpv a try and have moved on to that. So far I have been happy
with mpv.
Eric Pozharski
2020-05-22 10:48:16 UTC
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*SKIP*
Post by root
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
*SKIP*
However I'm not sure slackpkg yet gives a way to keep your current
kernel *and* download a new one to install alongside then add to
/etc/lilo.conf.
After digging, no, slackpkg doesn't. Slackware does ;)

$ ls -lth /boot/*vmlinuz*
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 22 May 7 15:14 /boot/vmlinuz-generic -> vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 22 May 7 15:14 /boot/vmlinuz -> vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M May 2 20:11 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M Apr 2 21:30 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.30
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M Feb 20 01:42 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.21

That might be an abomination though.

*CUT*
--
Torvalds' goal for Linux is very simple: World Domination
Stallman's goal for GNU is even simpler: Freedom
Rinaldi J. Montessi
2020-05-22 23:03:49 UTC
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Post by Eric Pozharski
*SKIP*
Post by root
If you run current Slackware do you have any problems?
*SKIP*
However I'm not sure slackpkg yet gives a way to keep your current
kernel *and* download a new one to install alongside then add to
/etc/lilo.conf.
After digging, no, slackpkg doesn't. Slackware does ;)
Well... yes and no. I rsync with the current x86-64 repository and the
latest kernel is always on hand. By blacklisting kernel in slackpkg's
blacklist it will not be upgraded with the upgrade-all option. Then
upgrade with upgradepkg and edit /etc/lilo.conf at your leisure.

Run lilo afterwards (note to self) ;-)

upgradepkg --dry-run /usr/src/spkg/CURRENT/slackware64/*/kernel*.txz

upgradepkg /usr/src/spkg/CURRENT/slackware64/*/kernel*.txz
Post by Eric Pozharski
$ ls -lth /boot/*vmlinuz*
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 22 May 7 15:14 /boot/vmlinuz-generic -> vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 22 May 7 15:14 /boot/vmlinuz -> vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M May 2 20:11 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.38
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M Apr 2 21:30 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.30
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 6.3M Feb 20 01:42 /boot/vmlinuz-generic-5.4.21
That might be an abomination though.
*CUT*
--
Critic, n.:
A person who boasts himself hard to please because nobody tries
to please him.
-- Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary"
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